Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

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Friday, July 31, 2009

CAHUENGA PASS PHOTO INVESTIGATION


The most damaged photograph in the High Collection is this image (possibly taken during the construction of the Cahuenga Pass). I was exploring my photoshop skills and just for fun repaired the photo. The original was not cleaned or repaired, nor will the repaired image be presented as original.
Below is a close up of the automobile.

HIGH COLLECTION CONTINUES TO YIELD TREASURES FOR THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY



What did better off residents of the San Fernando Valley do when summer's heat soared? They went on a seashore excursion to Venice Beach. Naturally, in c. 1895, they would have dressed appropriately in full-length dresses, suits and high socks for the kids. Well, at least they were less likely to get sunburns.

Thanks Dave High for helping us preserved these images for future generations.
refer to HC-15

Interested in fashions? Become a volunteer for your Museum today. Call 1 (818) 347-9665 to see how you can become involved.

BICYCLES PLAY A BIG ROLE IN SAN FERNANDO VALLEY HISTORY

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Bert Holiway - Photograph - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Dave High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

When your Museum received Los Angeles City Councilman, Tom LaBonge’s newsletter today, I thought it would be fun to introduce his comments with this photograph of Bert Holiway and his bicycle.
Your Museum is hoping that one of you bicycle fans out there will be able to help us identify the year that Bert Holiway posed for this photograph in Los Angeles. Refer to photograph HC-14
One thing is for sure, Bert isn't an AIDS Lifecycle rider, because he isn't wearing a helmet!

Now for Tom LaBonge’s message:
“This is a great time of year for riding bikes in the city and the Department of Transportation has installed 285 new bike racks in Los Angeles. Councilmember LaBonge worked to have some placed in the Fourth District, including in Larchmont, Studio City and Hollywood. If you're interested in more information: http://ladot.lacity.org/pdf/PDF163.pdf
You can subscribe to Tom’s on line newsletter through:
LaBonge.News@lacity.org

In the fall, Councilman LaBonge will once again be leading one of his famous bike rides through his district in the San Fernando Valley. We'll let you know when to get ready for it, via this blog.

Bicycles are a big part of San Fernando Valley history. Want to be a part of preserving and displaying bicycle history? Call your Museum today at: 1 (818) 347-0665

GARY FREDBURG WORKS TO MAKE THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY A REALITY

'57 Chevy July 2009 in the parking lot of the Los Angeles Police Museum. (click on image to enlarge)
From your Museum’s inception, our plans have been to make San Fernando Valley history accessible to all of the residents of our many communities. The Museum’s Secretary (and founding Vice President), Gary Fredburg works tirelessly to identify potential sites for our future mobile exhibits and to identify historic venues. Right now, Gary is studying structures of architectural or historical importance that might act as satellite locations for our many planned activities.
Just for the joy of it, and in anticipation of the re-opening of historic Phil’s Diner in North Hollywood, Gary is searching for pristine copies of Phil Everly’s vinyl L.P., “Phil’s Diner”. The Museum of the San Fernando Valley plans to have an exhibit in the NoHo about the history of Phil’s Diner in conjunction with its re-opening. In the process, Gary Fredburg is also collecting information about the life and career of the great recording artist Phil Everly.
In addition to this work, Gary also searches for San Fernando Valley memorabilia to add to The Museum’s archives. Last week he gave your Museum:
California Earthquake 71 soft back pictorial book
Church in San Fernando 1949 (historic postcard)
Sepulveda Methodist Church 1962 (North Hills) (postcard)
Long Building - Mission San Fernando 1985 (postcard)

Thursday, July 30, 2009

RANDY HOFFMAN'S CHILE MY SOUL



"Jerry - It's gone.
The San Fernando Valley (in fact all of Southern California) lost a wonderfully unique restaurant, Chili My Soul, with the death of its creator/chef, Randal (Randy) Hoffman on June 18, 2009. Chili My Soul is now closed and its future is in doubt. Randy loved to play the drums, and he prided himself in the creation of the most wonderful chili - in fact his restaurant featured over 35 of his chili recipes. On any given day about fifteen of them, rated in heat from one to ten, were available to his customers. Randy was a perfectionist, using only the finest ingredients in a process that took 30 hours or more of simmering during which he skimmed off the fat four times. His chili was not only delicious, it was healthy. He loved to greet his fans and urged them to taste a sample before ordering. His customers, many who considered him a friend, traveled from close and far for his gourmet chili. He started as a chef decades ago by supplying other restaurants with his specialty. In the 1980's he opened his own take-out chili restaurant, Chili My Soul, at a strip mall located at 4928 Balboa Blvd., Encino. Eventually, he took over the store next door and added an area to sit and dine. For so many of his customers, so proud that the San Fernando Valley had a great place to get their chili fix, Randy Hoffman's death is a very sad event.
- Alan H. Simon"

Chili My Soul - 4926 - 4928 Balboa Blvd (at Ventura Blvd), Encino, CA - Photo by Alan H. Simon taken on July 27, 2009, after owner Randolph (Randy) Hoffman died. Restaurant was closed.

WIDENING CAHUENGA PASS IN 1911

2009 The Year of Valley History

Widening Cahuenga Pass – 1911 (photograph) Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from David High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

The original historic image of the widening of Cahuenga Pass taken in 1911 is very dark. When processed the workers and machinery were clarified considerably.
Refer to photograph HC-13 artifact number: 0709-050-960

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.
Interested in transportation history. Come join your Museum Community and help us build our transportation collection. Call 1 (818) 347-9665 today.

MAMMOTH CACTUS IN SAN FERNANDO c. 1895

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Mammoth Cactus in San Fernando c 1895 - Gift to the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley July 2009 from Dave High

Water rationing is nothing new to the San Fernando Valley. Conservation of water was a way of life to the early pioneer families who settled here in the late 1800s. This delightful photograph, part of the David High Collection, marked in pencil :"Mammouth" Cactus - San Fernando.
Fred Berk (Librarian of The Museum) and Guy Weddington McCreary have began their study of the High Collection photographs, and Fred reports, "Many of the unmarked photos have been identified already."
Refer to photo HC-12 artifact number: 0709-050-959

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.
Photos, postcards, memorabilia to contribute? Call 1 (818) 347-9665

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

ROSCOE ESSINGTON OF TOLUCA, CALIFORNIA

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Roscoe Essington - Toluca, California - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Dave High - July 2009

Refer to image HC-10

This photograph was done by F. G. Schumacher, Gallery of Photographic Arts - 107 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal.
Negatives preserved Duplicates of which can be had at any time.

CAMPO DE CAHUENGA IN 1978

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Campo de Cahuenga - Newsletter clipping 1978 - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Dave High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

No date appears on this image clipped from a likely Rotary Club newsletter from 1978 or 1979. An item on the back of this picture reads "Hollywood Youth Program: A letter from George Buzza, President of Hollywood Rotary Club, invites our President...."
George Buzza was the President of the Hollywood Rotary in 1978-1979
Refer to HC-9 artifact number: 0709-050-957



The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

ELECTRIC RAIL CAR COMES TO LANKERSHIM / NO HO

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Gasoline Powered Mackeen Railroad Engine/Car c. 1908 - Photograph gift of Dave High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
While the depot to the left may be Lankershim Depot, is not as yet proven.

In 1908, the Mackeen Coach Company began the manufacture of a gasoline powered passenger cars. The Mackeen had dual engines. Mackeen Lines, according to donor Dave High, was a sub-division of the Union Pacific Railroad Company.
Refer to HC8 artifact number: 0709-032-956

RICHARD HILTON'S HARD WORK FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

The Director of Tour Operations for The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is Richard Hilton. He is one of busiest members of your Museum's Board of Directors.
Here are a few of the things he's working on for this August: setting a date for the next walking tour of the historic NoHo., printing an information card for our walking tourists, securing banners for The Museum's information tables, arranging for a special Museum tour of NASA’s Burro Flats Cave Paintings, and preparation for the Northridge Centennial History Committee of which he is the chair.
If all this work isn't enough for Richard, he's a member of the Weddington House Heritage organization and working to secure the historic Weddington House for North Hollywood Park.
Actors and others working in the arts will soon learn here about Richard Hilton's unique class entitled Unleashing Your Creativity, a program to be sponsored by The Museum of the San Fernando Valley and Valley Arts organizations.

Want to pitch in to help Richard Hilton and others in the Museum Community build The Museum of the San Fernando Valley? Join your Museum's volunteers today. Call 1 (818) 347-9665


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Center of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

EARLY PHOTOGRAPH OF PERSHING SQUARE

A festival, likely in what is now Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles. Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Dave High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

The young men in uniforms are holding rifles “at ease” at their right sides. They may be a ceremonial rifle corps. Above the uniformed men are men with rounded hats with horizontal stripes. The tuba suggests that this group is a band.
The man approaching the camera is dressed in a three piece suit, but he is wearing a white scarf around his neck. This may be a ceremonial item.
The palm tree tells us that the location is in a tropical or semi-tropical area. This coupled with the Hampton Arms Hotel, across the park, reveals that it was almost certainly photographed in downtown Los Angeles.
According to William Shillingberg a western memorabilia expert, “John Flood first met Wyatt Earp in 1906 at The Hampden Arms, a four-story brick rooming house owned by Mrs. Nellie C. Blair at 516 W. 5th Street in downtown Los Angeles.”
A visit to “A Visit to Old Los Angeles” a blog site by Brent C. Dickerson (http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor/socal10.html) reveals an historic postcard on which the signage in this photograph can be clearly seen.
The year of this photograph is not known, but the image was important enough to be saved in the High Collection. In 1918, the city’s Central Park was renamed Pershing Square as a result of the patriotism associated with World War I.
Comments should refer to HC6

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley collects artifacts and documents related to the history of World War I, Los Angeles and California. Your input about this image from the Dave High Collection, and other postings of this blog are very welcomed. Don’t let your family’s history end up in a garage sale.
Call 1 (818) 347-9665 to donate documents and historic artifacts. Contributions to your Museum are tax deductible.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, July 27, 2009

BURRO FLATS PICTOGRAPHS - A NATIONAL TREASURE IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

NASA booklet image (click to enlarge)

Creative genius seems to have been a part of San Fernando Valley history, since human beings first inhabited this part of America. The amazing treasures of Burro Flats in the Santa Suzanna Mountains, just above Chatsworth are a national treasure. The preservation of these pictographs is the first priority of our Museum. Read what NASA has to say:
"The pictographs at Burro Flats are a remarkable record of prehistoric Native American art. Archaeologists who have visited the site have said it includes some of the most dramatic and best preserved pictographs known and is among the finest examples of prehistoric pictographic art in North America."

Are you willing to step forward to save the treasures of the San Fernando Valley for today and for future generations? Join your Museum Community today. Take a walking tour of the historic No Ho. Contribute artifacts and or financial support to your Museum. Ask about The Museum's several community committees. Help us grow The Museum's library of Valley and California history. Call 1 (818) 347-9665

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Break In At Campo de Cahuenga

2009 - The Year of Valley History

One of the most important historical sites in western America was broken into on July 26th, 2009. GSD police responded to Campo de Cahuenga's security alarm approximately 9:47 pm.
On a first walk through this morning, it appears that nothing was harmed, vandalized or missing in the structure. A window pane, however was broken in order to give the intruded access to the place where America's dream of Manifest Destiny was completed.
This break in, while apparently little more than a minor incident, demonstrates once again the vulnerability of historic structures that are closed for long periods of time. Each delay in completing the restoration of Campo de Cahuenga and the moving of the precious old Weddington House to its new home in North Hollywood Park gives the impression to vandals and vagrants that a structure isn't being monitored.
Help safeguard the historical treasures of the San Fernando Valley today. Call 1 (818) 347-9665 and be counted.

IOWA CIVIL WAR SOLDIER'S PHOTO IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY?

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Ovid Hare Death Notice 1903 - Gift of Dave High to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. (click on image to enlarge)

Ovid Hare enlisted into the Union Army in Butler County, Iowa. He was a member of Company E, in the 32nd Iowa Volunteer Infantry. Ovid was 74 years old when he died on Sunday, August 2, 1903 at his home on `43 North Anderson Street, Los Angeles, California. Thousands of Civil War veterans made their way eventually to the warm climate of Southern California. Our first discovery about him, was that he enlisted in Butler County, Iowa.
Stay tuned as your Museum discovers more about this man, about his life and perhaps his burial in the Federal Cemetery near UCLA. We will also be alerting the Butler County, Iowa Historical Society and the Iowa State Museum of our image.
STAY TUNED!
Refer to this image as the Ovid Hare (death notice) artifact number: 0709-032-952 HC 5

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Sunday, July 26, 2009

MORE ABOUT THE BROWN CREEK DAM

2009 - The Year of Valley History

The Brown Creek Dam - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Richard Hilton - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

As mentioned in an earlier posting on this blog, we are looking for information about the historic Brown Creek Dam above Chatsworth, California. The dam is shown in this recent photograph by Richard Hilton, member of your Museum's Board of Directors. Call your Museum if you wish to share information about the dam. 1 (818) 347-9665


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Saturday, July 25, 2009

MINNIE ANDREWS TOLUCA CALIF c 1890

2009 - The Year of Valley History
Minnie Andrews - Toluca, Calif. - Photo gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from David High July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

This photo of the handsome Miss Minnie Andrews, taken around 1890 to 1900, is part of the wonderful collection of historic photographs donated to your Museum by Dave High. It is featured here, not only to show off our new treasure, but to exemplify the challenges of such a gift.
We begin by scanning the image and giving it a number. In Miss Andrews case it is: artifact number: 0709-032-951 HC 4
We record its condition, donor, year and month of the donation, if it has been scanned, where it is located as an electronic image (in this case HISTORIC PERSONS, Andrews), where the original is located, and additional notes. In this case the notes read: " Miss Minnie Andrews – Toluca, Calif. c 1890
Art Studio Sunbeam 236-238 South Main Street, Los Angeles, Calif."
We will be soon water marking all of our images used on the internet.
Then the fun begins: Who was Miss Andrews? When was the photo taken? How does she fit into the history of the San Fernando Valley?
Lot of work. If you or your organization wish to use an image belonging to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley please call us.
Do we have an expert out there who can advise us about watermarks? 1 (818) 347-9665

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Friday, July 24, 2009

AUDIE MURPHY - A REAL SAN FERNANDO VALLEY HERO

The following is the citation accompanying Audie Murphy’s Congressional Medal of Honor:

Second Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by six tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to a prepared position in a wood, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, one of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire, which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machine gun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from three sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad that was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued his single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way back to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack, which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.”

Thursday, July 23, 2009

LEADERS OF AEROSPACE CANCER MUSEUM OF EDUCATION ADDRESS THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

2009 - The Year of Valley History

(click on image to enlarge)
At the invitation of Lianne Schirmer, advisor to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, Christina Walsh and William Preston Bowling addressed the July meeting meeting of our association on July 22nd. Their organization, Aerospace Cancer Museum of Education (ACME), is located in Chatsworth, California.
According to ACME's website: "The Aerospace Cancer Museum of Education, Los Angeles, opened on May 9th, 2008 as a center where community members can learn about Santa Susana Field Laboratory and the historic clean-up initiatives to take place as recently directed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger brought forth by Senator Sheila Kuehl and Assemblymember Julia Brownley. In a unique and unprecedented collaboration by founders William Preston Bowling and Christina Walsh, ACME will organize and activate a public hungry for accurate information about this and other astronomically polluted Nuclear and Aerospace Research sites."
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley will actively collect information on the disaster in the Santa Suzanna Mountains, the Rocketdyne Installation, medical issues resulting from the meltdown, and NASA involvement in the San Fernando Valley. We will share our collections, library materials and oral histories with ACME. Our Board and members will visit the ACME museum and publish ACME events on our blog.

Saving our histories for ourselves and future generations is our responsibility. Call your Museum today and get involved:
1 (818) 347-9665

CAN YOU IDENTIFY THIS MYSTERY CHURCH IN SAN FERNANDO

Unknown church in San Fernando - historic postcard - gift from Gary Fredburg July 2009.

Can you identify this church in San Fernando?
Postmarked San Fernando, Calif. 26 April 1949

Permission to copy this image should be obtained from The Museum of the San Fernando Valley
1 (818) 347-966


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

GREAT CHANCE TO SEE HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN

(click on image to enlarge)

The San Fernando Valley has an extensive Filipino-American population. Your Museum collects, archives and shares information about Filipino culture and history.


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

SOME VERY BAD NEWS ABOUT THE WEDDINGTON HOUSE

During the best of times, preserving, moving and restoring an historic house is a time consuming challenge. Unfortunately, time is not on the side of the highly endangered Weddington House in the San Fernando Valley.
Once hidden between industrial buildings that have been torn down, the grand old Weddington has for some months been totally exposed. Without residential neighbors and development projects slowed by the failed economy, the Mother House of North Hollywood was struck by vandals this week.
For the last several months, the issues of weed abatement, jimmied doors, a broken window and pigeons in the attic have been the old structure's bane, but this week has been different!
An entire roof section of one of the most historic houses in the Valley has been the target of destructive tagging by a dangerous, territorial street gang. The glaring markings are, in effect, a challenge to rival thugs a statement that the area belongs to the vandals. Retaliation, in the form of more tagging will follow.
History and cultural communities must act now, if the Weddington House is to be saved for us, and for future generations.
In the early days of our Republic, townspeople alarmed their neighbors and demanded action through something called a "huy and cry". Let's cry out together that the Weddington House must be protected and moved to North Hollywood Park immediately.

Jerry Fecht - The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 1 (818) 347-9665



The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

MUSEUM RECEIVES VINTAGE PHOTOS FROM DAVE HIGH

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Graduation Program Lankershim High School 1897 - Gift to the Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Dave High - July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

An important collection of valuable vintage photographs has been received by your Museum from Chatsworth resident Dave High. An artist and printer by trade, Dave worked for many years at Hanna Barbera and was given the photo collection as a gift. The collection contains photographs, tin types, post card images and even this 1897 graduation program from Lankershim High School. The collection contains images from the towns of Lankershim and Toluca (then likely the same place) and pictures from the early days of Storm Lake, Iowa. (The Weddington family was among the founders of Lankershim, now North Hollywood and Toluca Lake.)
The program featured a banjo solo by Fred Weddington called: A Sketch - The Wheel of Time, with Lankershim at its Hub.

The San Fernando Valley, in the "Hub" of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.
Call your Museum today, and get involved. 1 (818) 347-9665

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

RARE WORLD WAR II PHOTO AT TIMM AIRCRAFT

2009 - The Year of Valley History
Workers at Timm Aircraft 1942 - Photo loaned to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Dave High July 2009 (click on image to enlarge).
Early “barnstormers” after World War I thrilled the world with their aero-acrobatics. One of the best of these was Otto Timm. His love of flight and dedication to his craft caused him to begin the O.W. Timm Aircraft Company in Glendale, California in 1928. One of his first achievements was the building of an enclosed biplane aircraft, the precursor of modern commercial passenger aircraft. He renamed his business the Timm Aircraft Company in 1934.
(Otto’s brother, Wallace Timm was responsible for much of the early aerial photography of the movie business.)
As World War II approached Timm Aircraft geared up for the coming conflict. By 1942, when this photograph of “Skeets” High and a fellow worker was taken, Timm Aircraft was in full scale production.
Skeets is the young man at the right of the photograph. He left the Timm company shortly after this photo was taken, to serve as a training sergeant in the United States Army at Camp Roberts, near Paso Robles, California.
Dave High, who loaned this photograph to The Museum, recalls living just off the military base with his mom in a converted gasoline station, not an uncommon occurrence when construction came to a halt for the war effort.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

MUSEUM MEETS JULY 22

2009 - The Year of Valley History

W.P. Whitsett and Founding of Van Nuys - Photo gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Dave High July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)


The next meeting of the combined Boards of Directors and Advisors of The Museum will be on July 22, 2009. Location: The 2nd floor Board Room - Economic Alliance 5121 Van Nuys Boulevard, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403
6 to 8 pm. Parties interested in being part of The Museum's agenda should telephone: 1 (818) 347-9665


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the world, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, July 20, 2009

"SUMMER OUTING" 1897 REDONDO BEACH

2009 - The Year of Valley History

"Summer Outing" 1897 - Redondo Beach - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by David High July 2009 (click on image to enlarge) High Collection # 1.

What better way to deal with the over 100 degree temperatures this week in the San Fernando Valley, than this great picture given to The Museum by Dave High today. Taken in 1897, two Valley residents make the best of a summer day on an "outing" in Redondo Beach. Perhaps this well protected young couple understood 112 years ago that Redondo Beach and the Valley are at the same latitude as Oran Algeria and Cairo Egypt.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves at great Museum of history and culture.

Sunday, July 19, 2009

THE ILIAD BOOKSHOP RELOCATES IN THE NO HO

2009 The Year of Valley History

The Iliad Bookshop Relocated - Photo take for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

By the time that I heard that Dutton's Bookstore in North Hollywood was closing, it was too late. The California history and San Fernando Valley/Los Angeles sections were already pillaged. So, when I heard rumor that the great old Iliad Bookshop was closed I was really disheartened. But, The Iliad didn't close its doors at all!
Here, long time bookstore worker Ricky Grove (who discovered his first bookstore at the age of 13 - and never left the profession) keeps tract of The Iliad's treasures while a new air conditioning unit is installed - in what area of the store? The Los Angeles / San Fernando Valley history section, of course.
I had an appointment, so I settled into the $3 to $10 section, where I bought The Museum's library a well illustrated work called Hollywood Goes To War. So, I'll just have to get back soon.
The Illiad Bookstore
5400 Cahuenga Boulevard North Hollywood, CA 91601
(corner of Cahuenga and Chandler) 1 (818) 509-book

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Saturday, July 18, 2009

1997 BANK HEIST IN THE NO HO

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Los Angeles Police Car riddled by bullets 1997 - Los Angeles Police Historical Society Museum - Photo taken by Gerald Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley July 2009

Those of us who live in the metropolitan communities of Los Angeles are used to news broadcasts being interrupted with “breaking news” about an overturned semi truck on the 405 freeway or a brush fire in Griffith Park, but on February 28, 1997 – the news was urgent and desperately real! The Bank of America in North Hollywood was being robbed, customers and clerks terrorized and a gunfight between police and criminals in progress.
By the end of the ordeal 10 Los Angeles Police Officers several civilians hurt and two heavily armed gangsters dead.

Today, four of us took advantage of the one Saturday a month opening of the Los Angeles Police Historical Society Museum. We were amazed about the extent of San Fernando Valley history is on exhibit at
6045 York Boulevard in Los Angeles (adjacent to Highland Park).
These are some of the photographs that I took of a bullet riddled police car present at the worst bank robbery in Valley history. Try counting the bullet holes in the robbers’ would-be get away car.

Criminals' Get-Away Car (that didn't get away) 1007 HEIST IN THE NO HO - Los Angeles Police Historical Society Museum - Photo taken by Gerald Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley July 2009

Heist car 1997 - Los Angeles Police Historical Society Museum - Photo taken by Gerald Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley July 2009

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Friday, July 17, 2009

JOIN THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY COMMUNITY

2009 - the Year of Valley History

The Cascades 1955 Intake Magazine Los Angeles Department of Water and Power - gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's Library from Gary Fredburg 2009

Become part of building the future of the San Fernando Valley, by helping your Museum Community save our past.
Call: 1 (818) 347-9665 to discuss how you can become involved.

Water from the Eastern slopes of California's High Sierras rushes through the "Cascades, into the San Fernando Valley in 1955. This amazing water system still serves Los Angeles in 2009.

COMMUNITY MEETING ON SANTA SUZANNA MELTDOWN





PHYLLIS HANSEN LECTURE REVIEWED.

The following article appears in the July 2009 "The Valley" newsletter of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society.

Charming Way to Write a Book by Jacky Walker

Phyllis Hansen, author of Charming: Jewelry with a Message, regaled guests and members of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society on Thursday, June 25, with tales of charms and charm bracelet history.
“Charms are fairy tale tokens that carry messages,” Hansen said. “They tell time, reveal history, keep secrets, introduce you to new friends, tell tales, record genealogy, and are keepers of our soul.”
Hansen explained how charms were used by ancient Egyptians through the modern era when Queen Victoria popularized the miniature tokens with her penchant for wearing jewelry. She predicts that a new heyday for charms is surfacing. New uses for charms include adorning cell phones, photo frames, shoes, bookmarks, tiny
Christmas trees, dog collars, and even men’s watch fobs.
According to Hansen, the most popular charms are gold and silver, although she has seen charms made of lacquered wood and Bakelite. Turquoise/silver charms were avidly collected after Route 66 opened and tourism to the Southwest became popular.
Several members of the audience shared their charm bracelet history, including Liane Schirmer, whose charm bracelet was a joint gift at her recent milestone surprise birthday party. Each guest brought a charm representing a special memory that they shared with Liane, which was a great ice breaker and a memory she truly cherishes.
Hansen, a freelance writer, also explained how she came to write the book and the creative process of getting it published for her client the Brighton Collections, a leading accessories specialty store. Thank you, Phyllis, for a wonderful program!

MUSEUM MEETS JULY 22

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Clydesdales at Busch Gardens 1976 - Photograph and news release gift from Gary Fredburg to the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009

The next meeting of the combined Boards of Directors and Advisors of The Museum will be on July 22, 2009. Location: The 2nd floor Board Room - Economic Alliance 5121 Van Nuys Boulevard, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403
6 to 8 pm. Parties interested in being part of The Museum's agenda should telephone: 1 (818) 347-9665

The famous Anheuser - Busch Clydesdale horses were exhibited in the "Old Saint Louis" section of Busch Gardens on August 14th and 15th, 1976.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the world, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

PHIL'S DINER UNDER RESTORATION IN THE NO HO BY CASEY HALLENBECK

2009 - The Year of Valley History

- Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge) Model of Restored Diner - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Phil's Diner Awaiting Restoration - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Casey Hallenbeck Restores Phil's Diner - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Here’s some good news for those in the Museum Community who have been asking questions about the whereabouts of Phil’s Diner, the oldest railroad style diner lest in California. First, the heroic old eatery has not been “quietly destroyed” as has been rumored. And, second, the cherished diner is awaiting a full restoration in a secured and well protected area just in front of The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences on Lakershim Boulevard just north of Magnolia.
Owner Casey Hallenbeck, better known for his exciting film sets, including such works as The Firm and Conspiracy Theory, has enlisted The Museum of the San Fernando Valley to discover vintage images and photographs capturing the bygone era of Valley agriculture.
Check this blog’s postings from time to time as we relate progress to open Phil’s Diner in the heart of the NoHo Arts District.

If you can share images of early San Fernando Valley agriculture, please contact your Museum soon.
Telephone: 1 (818) 347-9665
E-mail: msfv@gmail.com

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

CONSTABLE FRED WEDDINGTON CAPTURES TWO NO HO BANDITS

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Constable Fred Weddington Captures Two No Ho Bandits
by Gerald Fecht
reprinted from the NoHo Arts Newsletter March 31, 2009

Once a narrow wooden bridge spanned the Los Angeles River at the base of the ruins of Campo de Cahuenga, where today Lankershim meets Ventura Boulevard. Travelers made their way by horse or buckboard down an unsure dirt road to the banks of the river and climbed precariously up the other side. In the late 1800s, it was a dangerous place in the daylight, let alone on that lingering twilight of a summer evening when Constable Fred Weddington waited to make his arrests.
Like most of the citizens of the sleepy farm town called alternatively Lankershim or Toluca, Fred Weddington followed a commercial occupation and held a civic job as well. Normally he was the proprietor of a general store, but tonight he was wearing the badge of town-constable. Like most lawmen in the last days of the Old West, Fred's duties were mostly dealing with an occasional fistfight or the antics of the town drunk. But, this night was different. Tonight he would confront two dangerous men, and hopefully make arrests for criminal assault and highway robbery.
In mid-World War II, a San Fernando Valley pioneer, Lincoln Hart related this story of Constable Weddington's frightening encounter. Folks in the Valley were still talking about the volunteer policeman's adventure over 50 years later.
A gentle breeze was just promising relief from the heat of the afternoon, when a badly beaten man struggled into the Weddington store. As his neighbors scurried to clean his bruises, the victim related how he was attacked by two surely thugs north of town at the crossing of Lankershim and San Fernando Roads. Aside from pocket change and a small pin knife, the thieves got away with five dollar gold piece (... a lot of money in those days!)
By the time Constable Weddington got to the site of the robbery, the criminals were gone, but a witness indicated that two scruffy characters had skirted the town of Lankershim and we likely heading to the treacherous Cahuenga Pass and an escape into Los Angeles. There was no time to gather a posse, so the part-time lawman headed alone toward the summer trickle of the Los Angeles River.
Unexpectedly, Weddington passed two men fitting the description of his suspects, lingering at the base of an ancient oak tree. Moving quickly beyond them, the constable caught a glimpse of what he decided was a pistol. He would continue to the Campo de Cahuenga bridge where he would execute his confrontation. Hopefully others from town would soon arrive to make his job safer. He hid his wagon near the ruins of old Campo de Cahuenga, and returned to the top of the bridge.
Crows called out their final defiance of nightfall, when the first sounds of boots on the wooden bridge drummed a warning to the young officer. His pistol already cocked, Weddington moved quickly before the men. "Hands up! Don't make me shoot!" Miraculously a horseman arrived, shouting, "Fred, I have them covered!"
In a dizzying whirl, Fred Weddington secured the largest of the men in heavy handcuffs. But, when his helper's horse reared, the other villain escaped down in the river's thick reeds. Other riders soon arrived from Lankershim and the search was on. At length, with the help of startled ducks, the villain was captured. By ten o'clock the heroes of Lankershim brought their captives into town, and secured them in a sturdy storage shed.
Dave Fuller would stand watch throughout the night. Grateful for an uneventful night, he, Constable Fred Weddington and other Lankershim residents, took their prisoners to the big city of Los Angeles. There a second search revealed the stolen gold piece hidden in larger of the two highwaymen's coat. The victim identified his pocket knife as a family gift, the bad guys were off to prison, and the adventure at the bridge of Campo de Cahuenga made its way into history.

The San Fernando Valley in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.
Call to support, volunteer your services or have ideas for your Museum
1 (818) 347-9665 or email us at msfv@gmail.com

Monday, July 13, 2009

ZELZAH WILL BE 100 YEARS OLD NEXT YEAR

2009 - The Year of Valley History
Detail of Los Angeles Map showing the Zelzah Community (click on image to enlarge)

ZELZAH Will be 100 years old in 2010.
If you want add a little adventure into your life, become part of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's NORTHRIDGE 100 HISTORY COMMITTEE.
Call your Museum today at: 1 (818) 347-9665 or email us at msfv@gmail.com

Get involved, life is too short to observe it from the sidelines.
The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Sunday, July 12, 2009

SUN VALLEY YOUTH ARTS CENTER

2009 - The Year of Valley History

Rock House in Sun Valley - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht July 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
Can you image the sense of adventure the children served by the Sun Valley Youth Arts Center feel as they approach this mysterious old rock house? Built in 1926, the "Rock House" serves today as the headquarters for creative expression for hundreds of San Fernando Valley children. This wonderful center is governed by the Los Angeles City Department of Cultural Affairs under the direction of the brilliant California artist Jesus "Chuy" Rangel. What better investment for our future as the Creative Capital of the World than to excite our children and youth about their creative potential!

Sun Valley Youth Arts Center
8642 Sunland Boulevard
Sun Valley CA 91352
telephone: 1 (818) 252-4619

Saturday, July 11, 2009

MICHAEL STEVENS IS VICE PRESIDENT OF MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

2009 The Year of Valley History
Sun Valley Youth Arts Center - 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

This last month, Michael Stevens was elected our first Vice President of Museum Development. Contact Michael for Museum sponsorships, in-kind services or services, donations or to become a member of his hard working fund-raising team. Michael's most immediate effort is to get The Museum's website up and running.
Leave Michael Stevens a message at 1 (818) 347-9665
The Museum's e-mail is: museumsfv@gmail.com



The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

STEVE DEVOL SHARES SOME OF HIS PHOTOGRAPHS FROM JULY WALKING TOUR OF NO HO

Audie Murphy's medals from World War II - No Ho Masonic Temple (click on image to enlarge) Photograph by Museum in-tourist Steve Devol

Bottom of the El Portal Marquee in the No Ho
(click on image to enlarge) Photograph by Museum in-tourist Steve Devol

Guy Weddington McCreary advisor to The Museum - On the No Ho historic walking tour today. (click on image to enlarge) Photograph by Museum in-tourist Steve Duval

Richard Hilton and his tour inside of the historic No Ho Post Office (click on image to enlarge) Photograph by Museum in-tourist Steve Devol

4th MUSEUM WALKING TOUR A SUCCESS

2009 - the Year of Valley History

Auction Bill - Horses and Mules from Lankershim and Van Nuys Ranches. No Ho Chamber of Commerce booklet

Thanks to Richard Hilton and supporting Board Member, the 4th Walking Tour of NoHo historic district was a big success today. 25 "in-tourists" braved the warm July weather to discover the amazing secrets of one of the Valley's oldest communities.
If you or your friends would like to be alerted about the next No HO tour, or upcoming tours of Studio City and Van Nuys, give your Museum a call: 1 (818) 347-9665)

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Friday, July 10, 2009

BECOME PART OF YOUR MUSEUM COMMUNITY TODAY

Liane Schirmer, son and Peter Shire 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Involvement with your Museum is an adventure. Being part of bringing about a real Museum for the San Fernando Valley is so rewarding! Here Liane Schirmer (chair of The Museum's Committee on Religion) introduces her son to the great California artist Peter Shire.
Start your Museum experience by joining Richard Hilton tomorrow morning at the Amelia Earhart statue in North Hollywood Park (Magnolia and Tujunga) at 10 am. In about 2 and 1/2 hours, you'll get hooked on San Fernando Valley history and lore. The walking tour is yours for a $10 donation, and the memories are free.

Join your Museum soon - telephone: 1 (818) 347-9665