Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

www.TheMuseumSFV.org




Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Part II The History of Jue Joe Ranch - Otto Brant; Free Zoom event; The Museum SFV History of Speaker Series

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, as part of its History of Speaker Series is pleased to present Part II The History of Jue Joe Ranch.

Date:  Saturday, September 26, 2020

Time:  Noon - 2:00 pm   (Learn about history during lunch!)

Cost:   Free * 

(*we would appreciate a $10 donation to support interview, video editing and coordination of this program - via PayPal or website)

Part II will be highlighting the relationship between Jue Joe and Otto Brant.


Excerpt from Jack Jue's blog...

One of the fascinating stories in the Jue Joe saga is his friendship with Otto Brant. We have followed Jue Joe's story up to Los Angeles where he is employed as a house boy on a wheat ranch in Chatsworth in 1893. 

In that same year, Otto Brant and his friend O.P. Clark founded the Title Insurance and Trust Company in Los Angeles which is destined to become the largest Title insurance company in the United States. How does a poor Chinaman who is a houseboy on a wheat ranch, meet up with and become fast friends with a wealthy Title insurance president? I do not have the answers, but I do have Otto Brant's life story which makes their association even more difficult to understand. Family oral history has Otto and Jue Joe becoming friends when they are both poor and both on the way to Los Angeles. If we follow Otto Brant's life story during the same years as Jue Joe this becomes very difficult to believe. There is ample documentation in real estate deeds and family oral history that Otto and Jue Joe were associates and friends but why or how that friendship developed is something I do not understand.

“Descendant of the 2nd emperor of the Song Dynasty (Zhao Gunagyi), Jue Joe was born and raised in a chicken coop, in 1860. He grew up dirt poor and vowed that his descendants would never suffer as he had. So at the age of 14 he sailed alone to California, working as a cabin boy, and jumped ship in San Francisco. He sailed with 16 lbs of rice and landed with 1/4 lb left. So he went to the Chinese Six Companies for help. They sent him to St. Helena and Marysville to work the vineyards. Then he found work on the Southern Pacific Railroad. In the Mojave Desert he met Otto Brant who was hoboing his way to L.A. They became friends and together hoboed to that destination. According to San Tong, Jue Joe learned business from Otto Brant and what land and water would mean to future settlers of the L.A. Basin. “ – written by Auntie Soo-Yin.

In 1913, California passed a law that forbid aliens (Non-Americans) from purchasing land in the state. The openly racist ALIEN LAND ACT was aimed at a growing and prosperous Asian population whose success threatened white hegemony in the Golden State.

But Chinese born Jue Joe was friends with the very powerful Otto Brant. The fascinating story of how Otto Brant helped his Asian friend purchase land, in spite of the restrictive law.

Franky Ortega, educator and historian of the SFV and WWII history tying in the valley will present.

Free to all Museum members and guests.

A $10 suggested donation would be appreciated to support YOUR Museum with the cost of video editing and organizing this programming. You can go to our website at www.TheMuseumSFV.org to make a donation on PayPal.

Presentation and Q&A session to follow.

Please RSVP on EVENTBRITE HERE.  You can also

ZOOM LINK HERE:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84260555591?pwd=ZUR4eGhhekNGNlhRRmtXRlB6QXk0QT09

Meeting ID: 842 6055 5591


Passcode: 570354


Thank you.


Sunday, September 6, 2020

9-12-20 - Noon to 2:00 pm; FREE; Zoom; PAI Artist Speaker Series - Join Christine Douglass

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley and its Public Art Initiative invites you to meet the September Artist Speaker Series guest, featuring, Christine Douglass.

Zoom presentation (see link below):
Saturday, September 12, 2020
Noon - 2:00 pm
Cost: Free*

(*suggested donation to support the Public Art Initiative of The Museum SFV - $10
Pay on our website, PayPal, Zelle)

 

Douglass is a local San Fernando Valley artist who has always enjoyed drawing but discovered her love for oil painting as an adult. She accidentally became an artist.  In 2004, after the passing of her late husband of 35 years, she found herself in deep despair.  

By 2006, she gave herself an assignment to find joy in her life.  She was not sure how to pursue or achieve this goal, but she decided that since she had done a lot of drawing and some painting when she was very young, she would sign up for an oil painting class.

The painting featured above is called Papa and Me.  It has a special place in her heart (learn more about it during the presentation) and it won First Place in the City of Los Angeles 2017 Senior Art Exhibit. 

Years later, she has been exhibiting many of her paintings to countless juried art exhibits throughout Southern California.  Her artwork is eclectic and tends to be realistic, but lately she has been introducing artwork that simply stems from her imagination. 

Attendees will be able to speak to Christine at the end of the presentation, ask questions about her career, specific paintings as well as inquire about items for sale which include paintings, blank note cards, purses, handbags and prints on canvas.  

You can view her artwork too at www.paintingsbychristinedouglass.com.

Bring your lunch, invite family members, tell friends about it and enjoy a presentation on art and life.

The Zoom link is:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84782683275?pwd=dHFBRzVPOUp5eDZUNk5HZVVLWDhGdz09  

Meeting ID: 847 8268 3275

Passcode: 330556

Watch the presentation or listen in via phone - dial
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose), then add Meeting ID and passcode.

For any other event information, please contact Michel (Michael) Stevens at TheMuseumSFV@gmail.com or dial 747-202-3084.

Please also visit our website at www.TheMuseumSFV.org

Thank you.

 




Saturday, September 5, 2020

Jakob van Zyl, JPL engineer involved in numerous space exploration missions, dies

 Jakob van Zyl, an engineer who held crucial positions at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and was involved in numerous space exploration missions over decades, has died at a hospital in Pasadena at age 63.

Van Zyl, who retired in 2019 after a 33-year career, suffered a heart attack Aug. 24 and died Wednesday, said Veronica McGregor, a spokeswoman for JPL.

His roles at JPL included serving as director for astronomy and physics, director for solar system exploration and associate director on a project to formulate a vision for JPL’s future.

“JPL and NASA are richer for his many technical and managerial contributions, and for his unwavering dedication and engaging personality,” JPL Director Michael Watkins said in a statement.

His early work in Earth sciences led to roles designing and developing missions using synthetic aperture radar.

A native of Namibia, Van Zyl received a degree in electronics engineering from Stellenbosch University in South Africa and earned his master’s and doctorate in electrical engineering from Caltech, which manages JPL.

JPL said Van Zyl was passionate about encouraging young people in Namibia and South Africa to pursue science. With his wife, Kalfie, he returned again and again to his homeland to conduct science programs.





Saturday, August 8, 2020

Sat. 8/29 Noon - 2:00 pm; FREE Zoom presentation; Preserving the San Fernando Valley: SurveyLA as a Springboard to Preservation Action

Preserving the San Fernando Valley: SurveyLA as a Springboard to Preservation Action

Please join The Museum of the San Fernando Valley on its ongoing "History of" speaker series, now virtual, as we continue to educate Museum members, donors and guests on the History, Art and Culture of the SFV.

Date: Saturday, August 29, 2020

Time: Noon - 2:00 pm

Cost: Free

RSVP HERE

(The Museum would appreciate a $10 donation via website, PayPal, Zelle to support our ongoing operations and to edit these presentations)

In 2017, the City of Los Angeles Office of Historic Resources completed SurveyLA, Los Angeles' first-ever citywide survey of its historic resources, in collaboration with the J. Paul Getty Trust. All of the data from the completed survey is now part of the City's comprehensive inventory of historic resources, HistoricPlacesLA. 

The survey is meant to inform the City's long-range planning and development project reviews, as well as to guide City decisions on future historic preservation protections.

However, important San Fernando Valley sites that have been identified in SurveyLA, such as Jue Joe Ranch, have been demolished or remain threatened because they lack formal historic designation. What were some of the key "discoveries" from the San Fernando Valley from SurveyLA and how can Valley leaders and residents best take the follow-up steps necessary to protect this important architectural and cultural heritage?

Join Ken Bernstein, Principal City Planner for Los Angeles City Planning's Office of Historic Resources for a visual tour of some of the Valley's most significant historic resources identified in SurveyLA -- and a discussion of how each of us can use this information to help preserve the buildings and places that we care about around the Valley.

Join Zoom Meeting below:


https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82775052780?pwd=OHo5a3lWK1J2NzdNM2x1Y0drbmNYQT09

Meeting ID: 827 7505 2780


Passcode: 484163

Dial by your location
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)


Meeting ID: 827 7505 2780
Passcode: 484163
 

For more information, please contact:
Michel (Michael) Stevens
President
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley


Tel: 818-347-9665
TheMuseumSFV@gmail.com
www.TheMuseumSFV.org

Saturday, August 1, 2020

The Museum SFV Speaker Series - History of Jue Joe Ranch - Sat. August 8th - Noon - 2:00 pm; Free

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, as part of its History of Speaker Series is pleased to present The History of Jue Joe Ranch.

Date:  Saturday, August 8, 2020

Time:  Noon - 2:00 pm   (Learn about history during lunch!)

Cost:   Free  (we would appreciate a $10 donation)


“Descendant of the 2nd emperor of the Song Dynasty (Zhao Gunagyi), Jue Joe was born and raised in a chicken coop, in 1860. He grew up dirt poor and vowed that his descendants would never suffer as he had. So at the age of 14 he sailed alone to California, working as a cabin boy, and jumped ship in San Francisco. He sailed with 16 lbs of rice and landed with 1/4 lb left. So he went to the Chinese Six Companies for help. They sent him to St. Helena and Marysville to work the vineyards. Then he found work on the Southern Pacific Railroad. In the Mojave Desert he met Otto Brant who was hoboing his way to L.A. They became friends and together hoboed to that destination. According to San Tong, Jue Joe learned business from Otto Brant and what land and water would mean to future settlers of the L.A. Basin. “ – written by Auntie Soo-Yin.

In 1913, California passed a law that forbid aliens (Non-Americans) from purchasing land in the state. The openly racist ALIEN LAND ACT was aimed at a growing and prosperous Asian population whose success threatened white hegemony in the Golden State.

But Chinese born Jue Joe was friends with the very powerful Otto Brant. The fascinating story of how Otto Brant helped his Asian friend purchase land, in spite of the restrictive law.

Franky Ortega, educator and historian of the SFV and WWII history tying in the valley will present.

Unfortunately, the Jue Joe Ranch is in the process of being demolished. It is historic but was not protected as an historic building by the City of Los Angeles. Franky has been out to the ranch and will provide an update on the latest with The Ranch.

Free to all Museum members and guests.

A $10 suggested donation would be appreciated to support YOUR Museum. You can go to our website at www.TheMuseumSFV.org to make a donation on PayPal.

Presentation and Q&A session to follow.

Please RSVP on EVENTBRITE HERE.  You can also

ZOOM LINK HERE:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85220437997?pwd=LzdVeCtaRGFFVmNMRWhlOXdmZ3podz09

Meeting ID: 852 2043 7997

Passcode: 957727

Dial-in via phone:

+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)


Thank you.

Please spread the word to family, friends and colleagues - you will enjoy this presentation!


Friday, July 17, 2020

Northridge Beautification Foundation - Support upcoming mural project and fundraiser

The Museum of the San Fernando fully supports the upcoming mural project of Northridge Beautification Foundation.


Please support this upcoming fundraiser. 

Dear Friends & Neighbors,

This is my last project for Northridge Beautification Foundation.  Please help me SPREAD THE WORD for all the work we've accomplished in the last 10 years! 
TAKE OUT (OR DINE ON PATIO) AT SHARKY'S ON JULY 31, AUGUST 1 & 2.  SHARKY'S in Northridge will match your contribution to benefit the fantastic Northridge Farms Horse Mural going up at 8765 Reseda Blvd. 
JUST SHOW THE FLYER (on your phone or printed out).

The mural will be an awesome addition to the history of the community.

Thank you for all the support you've given me.  We could not have had the art on the street without your contributions.

My very best!  Stay safe and healthy.
Andrea Alvarado
 Depiction of the upcoming Mural on Reseda Blvd., just north of Parthenia.

Support. Protect. Promote.

Please do your share to promote art and artists and community beautification in the valley.

Michel Stevens, The Museum SFV

Happy 65th Anniversary to Disneyland

On July 17 1955, Disneyland, officially opened to the public! 

This is the only Disney park built and stepped foot in by Walt Disney himself. 

Happy 65th anniversary to the original Magic Kingdom and the Happiest Place on Earth!

Walt Disney came up with the concept of Disneyland after visiting various amusement parks with his daughters in the 1930s and 1940s. He initially envisioned building a tourist attraction adjacent to his studios in Burbank to entertain fans who wished to visit; however, he soon realized that the proposed site was too small. 


After hiring a consultant to help him determine an appropriate site for his project, Disney bought a 160-acre (65 ha) site near Anaheim in 1953. Construction began in 1954.


Main Street, U.S.A. is patterned after a typical Midwest town of the early 20th century, and took much inspiration from Walt Disney's hometown, Marceline, Missouri.[40] Main Street, U.S.A. has a train station, town square, movie theater, city hall, firehouse with a steam-powered pump engine, emporium, shops, arcades, double-decker bus, horse-drawn streetcar, and jitneys.

Encircling Disneyland and providing a grand circle tour is the Disneyland Railroad (DRR), a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge short-line railway consisting of five oil-fired and steam-powered locomotives, in addition to three passenger trains and one passenger-carrying freight train. Originally known as the Disneyland and Santa Fe Railroad, the DRR was presented by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway until 1974. From 1955 to 1974, the Santa Fe Rail Pass was accepted in lieu of a Disneyland "D" coupon. With a 3 ft (914 mm) gauge, the most common narrow track gauge used in North America, the track runs in a continuous loop around Disneyland through each of its realms.



One of Disneyland's signature attractions is its Disneyland Monorail System monorail service, which opened in Tomorrowland in 1959 as the first daily-operating monorail train system in the Western Hemisphere. The monorail guideway has remained almost exactly the same since 1961, aside from small alterations while Indiana Jones Adventure was being built.


Disneyland was dedicated at an "International Press Preview" event held on Sunday, July 17, 1955, which was open only to invited guests and the media. 



Trivia:
How much did it cost for adults and children to enter Disneyland on July 18, 1955?
Answer below.


Although 28,000 people attended the event, only about half of those were invitees, the rest having purchased counterfeit tickets or even sneaked into the park by climbing over the fence.


The Special Sunday events, including the dedication, were televised nationwide and anchored by three of Walt Disney's friends from Hollywood: Art Linkletter, Bob Cummings, and Ronald Reagan.

On December 5, 1985, to celebrate Disneyland's 30th year in operation, one million balloons were launched along the streets bordering Disneyland as part of the Skyfest Celebration.

The "Happiest Homecoming on Earth" was an eighteen-month-long celebration (held through 2005 and 2006) of the 50th anniversary of the Disneyland Park, also celebrating Disneyland's milestone throughout Disney parks worldwide. Attractions that had been in the park on opening day had one ride vehicle painted gold, and the park was decorated with fifty Golden Mickey Ears. The celebration started on May 5, 2005, and ended on September 30, 2006.



Disneyland aerial view in 1963.

 
Disneyland aerial view in 2004.


Mickey and Minnie in 1955.


Walt Disney with models of the Magic Kingdom and the Matterhorn.

Answer trivia: A one-day ticket to Disneyland on 7-18-55 and in 1955 cost $1 for adults and $.50-$.75 cents for children. In addition to the price of entry, each of the park's rides had a fee.



Sources: Disneyland; D23; Wikipedia

 

posted by Michel Stevens, TMSFV

Saturday, July 4, 2020

History of July 4th and America - quiz - how much do you know?

Happy July 4th to all The Museum of the San Fernando Valley members, donors, Friends of The Museum and visitors.  How about a little holiday trivia?

Send us your answers and if you have these all correct, we will send you two passes to an upcoming Museum speaker or historic tour event ($20 value!)

Send answers to: themuseumsfv(at)gmail(dot)(com).



1) What historical event do Americans celebrate on the Fourth of July?

a) Official signing of the Declaration of Independence
b) George Washington's birthday
c) The first shots of the American Revolution
d) Formal adoption of the Declaration of Independence


2) How many founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence?

a) 13
b) 7
c) 32
d) 56

3) Which president first held a Fourth of July celebration at the White House?

a) George Washington
b) John Adams
c) Thomas Jefferson
d) James Madison


4) Which two U.S. presidents died on July 4th in the same year?

a) Thomas Jefferson and John Adams
b) James Monroe and Martin Van Buren
c) Millard Fillmore and Andrew Johnson
d) William Howard Taft and Warren G. Harding

5) Which U.S. president was born on Independence Day?

a) Calvin Coolidge
b) James Buchanan
c) Andrew Johnson
d) Ronald Reagan

6) What is the estimated number of people living in the 13 colonies on July 4, 1776?

a) 2.5 million
b) 9 million
c) 15 million
d) 30 million

7) Which of the following was not one of the original 13 American Colonies?

a) Vermont
b) Georgia
c) Massachusetts
d) North Carolina

Good luck!


Sources: Varied

The Daily New - Vote for your Favorite spots in the Valley

The Museum SFV members and visitors... it's that time of the year when we ask you to consider voting for YOUR Museum of the San Fernando Valley as the BEST museum in the valley.

Please vote online at:
www.DailyNews.com/Readerschoice

Deadline is August, Sunday, 30 2020.

You must vote for a minimum of five categories.

Thank you.



Carl Reiner, prolific comedy legend who created ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show,’ dead at 98

Carl Reiner, prolific comedy writer and legend who was most well-known for creating ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show,’ died on June 29, 2020 at the age of 98 in Beverly Hills.


His longtime writing partner Mel Brooks said he treasured Carl Reiner as a colleague and friend.

“Whether he wrote or performed or he was just your best friend — nobody could do it better,” Brooks said. “He’ll be greatly missed. A tired cliche in times like this, but in Carl Reiner’s case it’s absolutely true. He will be greatly missed."





The Bronx-born Reiner worked in a machine shop after high school as he took free acting classes sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. He made $1 a week for his first paid acting gig but had to promise not to brag about his good fortune to the other cast members at a Manhattan theater.

He first came to national attention in the 1950s on Caesar’s “Your Show of Shows,” where he wrote alongside Mel Brooks, Neil Simon and other comedy legends. He remained lifelong friends with Brooks; in their later years, the two often shared dinner and a movie at Reiner’s home.


Additional information can be read from article written by Steve Chawkins and Dennis McLellan of The Los Angeles Times by clicking HERE.



"I've done a lot in my life but have to say that show is what I'm most proud of," said Reiner. "We couldn't afford to shoot it originally in color and make a profit, but I'm so pleased with the colorized episodes – they look fantastic."


Reiner's 2017 HBO documentary, "If You're Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast," was also recently released on DVD in which he narrates a series of interviews with active nonagenarians.

"In my opening section, I'm reading the newspaper obituary section and remark if I'm not in it, I'll have breakfast," he said. "They thought that would make a good title."

The documentary features 90+ year-old guests still active in areas such as sports, fashion, music, comedy and acting, such as Dick Van Dyke, Kirk Douglas, and Reiner's long-time cohort in comedy Mel Brooks. "Truly a collection of remarkable people," said Reiner.

 "Truly a collection of remarkable people," said Reiner.


His son, famous director and actor, Rob Reiner tweeted, "Last night my dad passed away. As I write this my heart is hurting. He was my guiding light."

Hugh Downs, television pioneer at ‘Today’ and ‘20/20,’ dies at 99

Hugh Downs, a television pioneer whose career spanned over five decades that included serving as Jack Paar’s late-night announcer-sidekick, hosting NBC’s “Today” and ABC’s news magazine “20/20,” died on July 2nd in Scottsdale, Arizona.

More than three decades later, the Guinness Book of Records certified that Downs held the Guinness Record for on-air national commercial television time, with nearly 10,000 as of 1985. His total of more than 15,000 hours was surpassed by Regis Philbin in 2004.




Hugh Downs on The Today Show.  

Downs worked for five years on the “Tonight” show, 10 years hosting the game show “Concentration,” nine years hosting the “Today” show, four years hosting “Over Easy", and the first seven of his 21 years hosting “20/20.” 

Hugh Downs and Barbara Walters on the show 20/20.

To read entire Obit article written by Dennis McLellan, Stephen Battaglio of The Los Angeles Times, please click HERE.

Jack Paar, Hugh Downs and Jose Melis on the Tonight Show in 1960.

 
 
Hugh Downs on the show Concentration. 

Friday, June 19, 2020

7-11 Zoom Speaker Series - Join us; Telling History Through Charms from artist, author and historian Phyllis Hansen

Please join us with The Museum's ongoing virtual speaker series on Zoom Saturday, July 11th, from 2:00 pm- 4:00 pm with author and historian Phyllis Hansen as she takes you on a journey, Telling History Through Charms.

We ask for a $10 donation to support The Museum SFV.  RSVP HERE.

Upon reservation, we will send you the Zoom link a couple of days before the event.


Several years ago Phyllis authored a book on charms, “Charming: Jewelry with a Message” written for Brighton, the accessories company.

This led Phyllis down the rabbit hole into a wonderland learning where and when charms began, what stories they tell, how they are made, who wore them and why and how, even “what’s it all got to do with love.” She and the art team created some ideas of their own, too, on how to use, collect, and design with them, be it an old celluloid charm from a Crackerjack box or an heirloom that tells family history.


She has also collected charming stories from her audiences who brought their own remarkable bracelets to the programs. Now it’s your turn. 


Interactive portion of the meeting
- After the PowerPoint on Zoom, members who have vintage or contemporary charm bracelets and stories to show and tell can share with the rest of us, too.

Come bring your charming self and bracelets to the Zoom!


Phyllis is also a private collector, maintaining archives of several historic artists whose focus was on early California and its ranchos, pioneering figures and stories. Her love of research, combined with her passion for collecting, led her down new and quite surprising paths into the world of early California history herself. Meeting many remarkable, interesting people and making many exciting discoveries along the way, she now finds herself deeply immersed in the activities of a number of historical organizations and writing/editing on related topics. In free moments she does some art herself.

Presently Phyllis serves as Executive Committee Member, Programming & Education Lead with LA as Subject, Board member, Campo de Cahuenga Historical Memorial Association, concentrating on building the library and archives for this organization, Board member, San Fernando Valley Historical Society and was a founding member/director and officer of (and now advisor to) The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. She is a “Wikipedian,” volunteering on through local edit-a-thons to grow and expand the story of greater Los Angeles on the online encyclopedia site as well as helping balance the gender gap of Wikipedia’s contributors and content. In the past she has also been on the steering committee for Los Angeles’ Heritage Day. 


Please join us for a charming and engaging presentation!

RSVP and pay in advance HERE.

Thank you.


Monday, May 25, 2020

Memorial Day 2020 - trivia challenge


Can you guess the actual dates of each of the major wars since the Civil War?

A.  Civil War
B.  Spanish American War
C.  WWI
D.  WWII
E.  Korean War
F.  Vietnam War
G.  Iraq War
H.  Afghanistan War



1.  June 25, 1950 – July 27, 1953

2.  April 21, 1898 – August 13, 1898

3.  November 1, 1955 – April 30, 1975

4.  July 28, 1914 – November 11, 1918

5.  September 1, 1939 – September 2, 1945

6.  Oct 7, 2001 - Present

7.  April 12, 1861 – April 9, 1865

8.  Mar 20, 2003 – Dec 18, 2011



To play trivia:
Please send us your tally by calling  out one letter and one number such as A1 or C3 (just examples).

If you guess all correctly, we will send you two passes to an upcoming historic walking tour or speaker event ($20 value).

Please send in your guess to: TheMuseumSFV@gmail.com.


Leave us your name and email address you want us to respond to and we will notify you if you are a winner.

Thank you.


Michel Stevens -post

Memorial Day 2020 - to be remembered

The Museum SFV extends wishes to all military families and veterans of all wars on this Memorial Day 2020.

Here are some Memorial Day tidbits with an image from various wars.

When the first versions of Memorial Day were celebrated after the Civil War, the event went by the name Decoration Day, when flowers were laid on graves.

Civil War image

For more than 100 years, Memorial Day was reserved for honoring the lives of Civil War soldiers. The holiday didn’t expand to casualties of all American wars until after World War I.

WWI image

Although there has been debate on the birthplace of Memorial Day, the U.S. government has given Waterloo, New York, the official title.

WWII image


In 1868, about 5,000 people decorated graves at Arlington National Cemetery’s first Memorial Day ceremony. About the same number of people still gather there annually.

Korean War image


Until 1971, when Memorial Day became an official federal holiday, the annual commemoration stayed on May 30, no matter what day of the week.



Vietnam War

Federal guidelines say the flag should be displayed at half-staff only until noon, then go up to full-staff until sundown.



Iraq War

Congress passed a law in December of 2000 that requires Americans to pause at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day to honor the fallen soldiers.

Some of this trivia collected from Reader's Digest.


Michel Stevens -post







Wednesday, May 13, 2020

6-13-20 Speaker Series Event - David Coscia - author; The Southern Pacific in the SFV; Zoom presentation

The Museum SFV is very pleased to announce the return of author David Coscia with another fascinating book on the the history of the railroad in the San Fernando Valley - please join us for this special ZOOM presentation/ event. 

NOTE: With The Museum currently closed, we are moving our speaker series online - more people, members and guests will be able to enjoy our diverse and educational programming.

You will receive the Zoom meeting info the week before the event.

--- --- --- ---


in 1998, David Coscia began researching the railroad history of the San Fernando Valley. This culminated twenty years later with the publication of the book, Southern Pacific in the San Fernando Valley: 1876-1996. 

This massive tome focuses on the history of the Southern Pacific, and also has information on Amtrak, Metrolink, industrial railroads, and little known railroads such as the monorail that operated at Busch Gardens. 

Come learn about the beginnings of the railroads and the changes to the valley due their presence. We begin with small steam locomotives, graduate to giant steam locomotives, and close with more modern diesel locomotives. 

Born and raised in the community of Granada Hills, David has had a life-long love of history. In December 1993, he graduated with a B. S. in History from California State University, Northridge. 

Copies of his book will be available for purchase afterwards and David will be signing books. The retail price is $90, but copies will available for a significant discount. Please bring cash or a check, no credit cards accepted. We hope to see you there. 

RSVP: 1-818-347-9665 or email at TheMuseumSFV@gmail.com.

Saturday, June 13, 2020

Time: 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm (presentation, 2:00-3:30 and then Q&A)

Cost: $10 per person

Free for Museum members (emails us for link)

Please pay in advance via EVENTBRITE or PayPal you can pay via check sent to The Museum SFV.

Location of Speaker Event:

ZOOM Meeting - details/dial-in/log-in to be sent in early June

Please forward this to a family member, colleague or friend. This will be a terrific presentation and event. These type of events are to educate and will also allow The Museum to raise some needed funds during these coronavirus times.

Thank you.

Sunday, May 3, 2020

50th anniversary of Kent State shootings -where were you?

Tomorrow is the 50th Kent State shootings on May 4, 1970.

If you are old enough to remember that day, time and experience... please tell us about it.

Were you a college student at the time?

A parent with school-age children?

Were you in or did you have family in Vietnam at the time?


Help us educate valley residents and guests about this moment in history.


Enjoy an excerpt from an article in the OC Register via Daily News:

Kent State’s perpetual wound still painful after 50 years
Half a century after four students were killed on campus by military troops during an anti-war protest, some questions may never be answered

By | gharbrecht@scng.com | Orange County Register

Dean R. Kahler’s first college semester was nearing an end when he went home for the weekend 50 years ago this month to celebrate his 20th birthday.
Kent State University student Dean Kahler, who was paralyzed from the waist down by a National Guardsman’s bullet on May 4, l1970, eads a candlelight procession in September of 1970. s. (© Akron Beacon Journal/TNS/ZUMAPRESS.com)

The northeast Ohio country boy had worked in the Republic Steel melt shop in Canton to help pay for school and got a late start on college. He had a high draft number, so he didn’t worry about going to Vietnam. He looked forward to four years of academics to launch his chosen career in public service.

When he returned to campus Sunday afternoon, everything had changed. Two days of anti-war demonstrations culminated in the torching of a campus military building. The governor came to town vowing to restore order and called in the Ohio National Guard. Curfews were set and armed troops patrolled the grounds.

And within 24 hours, on May 4, 1970, Kahler’s world would forever change amid a violent combustion that put a hard time stamp on the end of the1960s and delivered the war to the doorstep of America’s heartland.

That’s when guardsmen opened fire on a crowd of students at Kent State University, killing four and wounding nine, including Kahler, who suffered a spinal-cord injury that permanently paralyzed him from the chest down. 


Please click HERE to read the rest of the article.


Also, enjoy the Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young song, written by Neil Young, OHIO

Click link here:  OHIO

OHIO: an iconic song written by Neil young in response to the Ohio, Kent state shooting.. listen to this  powerful Time capsule edition and experience the crisp nostalgic sound that would have once been heard ringing throughout Streets in Vietnam protests following the release of four beautiful souls in cold blood by the ONG on Kent state campus grounds in Kent, Ohio May 4, 1970


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Saturday, May 2, 2020

The Los Angeles Railroad Heritage Foundation - learn, grow, support

The Los Angeles Railroad Heritage Foundation

Preserving and sharing Southern California railroads past and present
through public outreach, photographic collections and adventure.


The Los Angeles Railroad Heritage Foundation is built on three elements: preservation, adventure, and education. Read about our exciting programs below.

Founded in 1999 by Josef Lesser and Ron Gustafson, the Los Angeles Railroad Heritage Foundation (LARHF) preserves, shares, and celebrates the history of railroading throughout the Los Angeles and Southern California.

We are sorry to inform The Museum SFV followers that Josef Lesser, loving husband, father, grandfather and friend passed away peacefully in his Los  Angeles home at 9:48 am on Friday, February 28, 2020. He was 83 years old. 




The organization continues to educate via satellite exhibits across the Southland, by sharing our archive of historic photography and memorabilia, by hosting member field trips and special events, by holding Scouting classes on railroad safety, and with our book publishing series. We employ our resources and expertise to support media, researchers, authors, heritage groups, and local communities.

The Museum SFV has been asked to locate a valley location and we hope to do so in the near future.

Also, upon opening up again, the LARHF had agreed to participate in our 2020 speaker series.

To learn more, please visit the LARHF website at www.LARHF.org.

Mailing Address:
Los Angeles Railroad Heritage Foundation
825 Colorado Blvd Ste 242
Los Angeles, CA 90041-1714