Wednesday, April 23, 2014

McKINLEY HOME FOR BOYS - ONCE IN SHERMAN OAKS

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY


 McKINLEY HOME FOR BOYS

"An Investment With Assured Dividends" Story of McKinley Home"  Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Neil Ally 2014  (click on images to enlarge them.)

 Administrative Building - McKinley Home for Boys - Structure was standing in 1956


In 1900, a retired minister Uriah Gregory and his wife Alice founded what was to become the McKinley Home for Boys in Artesia, California. In 1922, the Kiwanis Club of Los Angeles spearheaded a campaign resulting in the purchase of a 157 acre ranch in what is now Sherman Oaks.
Boys who lived at the McKinley Home were normal kids who had lost their parents or whose families could not care for them.
The Boys Home property at the corner of Riverside Drive and Woodman Avenue (Southwest of present day Notre Dame High School), remained until the late 1950s.

Support Your Museum Today:
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 
Plaza De La Cordillera
18860 Nordhoff Street 
2nd Floor 
Northridge, CA 91324

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

DOMESTIC CATS ARRIVED IN THE VALLEY WITH SPANISH COLONISTS

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Europeans brought many things to the New World,  among which were domestic animals that we know today. Spanish priests, soldiers and colonists were the first to introduce cattle, horses, donkeys, sheep, goats, house cats and many varieties of dogs and chickens to the San Fernando Valley. Though their church was very worried about "familiarity" with animals, the followers of Saint Francis Assisi (Franciscan monks) held animals in a higher status than their Catholic counterparts. 

< Most theologians in the 1700s taught that animals did not have souls. That made it ok to eat them.
 They taught about "the sin of familiarity" of seeing human traits in animals. This indicated that a devil might have possessed the creature - who else would someone be talking to?>


Once Spanish settlements in California were established, domestic cats were brought ashore from visiting ships. Cats were important for rat control on boats, and proved useful for killing rodents on land as well. Unfortunately the introduction of cats resulted in the extermination of native bird species. Feral cats have all but eliminated the bird population in the beautiful urban forest at Los Angles Valley College. When you visit our Valley Mission San Fernando Rey de EspaƱa look for the little "cat doors" that gave feline residents the run of the house.

GLYCERINE "WATER" FALLS AT THE TOPANGA MALL

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Around 1967, the Topanga Mall installed a really interesting glycerine waterfall. Beads of glycerine, about the size of water drops, moved as if in slow motion down wires of mono-filament fishing lines. The effect was dramatic. No doubt the glycerine drops attracted dust resulting in real clogging problems. But, while the fountains last, they were exceptional. 

Glycerine falls at the Topanga Mall c. 1967- Postcards gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2014.  (click on images to enlarge them.)


Monday, April 21, 2014

1915 METHODIST RELIGIOUS CARDS

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

On April 4th, 1903, Minnie Buckingham, was given a copy of Harper's Second Reader. Eight year old, Minnie lived in Oakley, Illinois. Tucked in the book were two religious cards, published quarterly at 10 cents per year, or 2 1/2 cents a quarter. The cards, produced by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South in Nashville, Tennessee in April and October 1914, were designed to teach New Testament stories to children. In 1914, the Protestant Methodist church still used the title of Methodist "Episcopal". The use of "South"in the church's title reflects the split between northern and southern congregations at the onset of the American Civil War. How these trading cards found their way into the 1903 reader of Minnie Buckingham is not known.


Religious teaching cards - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2014.