Wednesday, April 16, 2014

AN INSIGHT INTO ARMENIAN-AMERICANS IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

The following is an interview with Madlen Avetyan by her fellow CSUN student Monica Corpuz:

"Madlen Avetyan is a Masters student in the anthropology department at California University, Northridge. Madlen is doing an oral histories project for The Museum of the San Fernando Valleywhere she’s interviewing Armenians who live in the San Fernando Valley to understand their perspective on their cultural identity and how they build that identity and interact in the diverse cultural environment of Los Angeles. Madlen is in a particularly good position for this research since she is Armenian herself and was part of the diaspora of Armenians into the San Fernando Valley (she’s lived here for 22 years!).

 Madlen Avetyan - Graduate Student California State University Northridge

Glendale has one of the biggest, if not the biggest, population of Armenians in the United States. Madlen says that language and music are cultural tools used by Armenians in the San Fernando Valley to stay engaged and connected to one another. She says, “Families are the central focus of it all”, especially because of the diaspora. Christianity is also a large part of the culture for many Armenians and, because of this, churches are important congregating places. She has specific memories of the Glendale Central Church,  (one of the oldest Armenian churches in Glendale) during special events, like Easter Sunday, the church is so full that people have to wait outside for hours before they can even go in! This was a blessing in disguise since it provided an opportunity to see friends and to meet extended family that under different circumstances, they would not have met. These religious and social events provide a sense of community and involvement for Armenians of the diaspora in the San Fernando Valley.
Madlen says that Armenian culture in Glendale is so visible and palpable that after she moved from the city, she used to make special trips to drive through every once in a while just to feel that instant connection with the community. Many of the restaurants, shops and small independent stores are brimming with Armenian culture.
During her research, Madlen found that one way in which Armenians built and changed their culture after the diaspora to the San Fernando Valley, was for older men to gather at Maple Park to play backgammon and spend time with one another. She says that traditionally in Armenia, elderly parents would go to live with their eldest son, but that practice is not common in the United States. Instead, these men go to the park to catch up on familial happenings and to re-create their place in the community.
Madlen’s work on the oral histories of the Armenians of the San Fernando Valley is a beautiful way of recognizing and learning about the different cultures, and their different perspectives, of the greater Los Angeles area. Madlen says, “Being part of the Armenian Diaspora in the San Fernando Valley is all about connecting with family through Armenian food, language and the community”.
For more information on what it is to be Armenian, please check out this website: Armeniapedia.org.

Monday, April 14, 2014

MONTAGE OF VALLEY HISTORY ON MENU COVER

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

When Tony Evans opened the "Talk of the Valley" restaurant on 6842 Van Nuys Boulevard in Van Nuys, he created a stunning cover for his 1965 menu. Few images have been exemplified the culture and history of our Valley than this image. 

 (Left)  Mexican era vaquero encounters a yellow breasted meadow lark, violinist and talk show host, football star, actors in an epic movie, and a jazz bassoonist. (click on this image to enlarge it.)

EARLY 1911 PHOTOS OF VAN NUYS PRINTED IN 1960

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Recently, Gary Fredburg (bless his heart) donated a "Winter 1960 Pionee"r booklet pritned by Valley Federal Savings.  It contains some great photographs of the founding and early photos of Van Nuys. Ihope you enjoy them. 
 The first street car arrives in Van Nuys. It was cause for a large barbecue celebration. 
(click on the images to enlarge them)

December 16, 1911 - First street car arrives in Van Nuys from Los Angeles

Building materials arrive for the building of Van Nuys in 1911

First newspaper and printing shop in Van Nuys 1911


 Van Nuys Boulevard (then Sherman Way 1911) looking north. Note the rose bushes and palms.

D.W. Whitsett sold houses and lots from his Tract Office in Van Nuys. It was on Van Nuys Boulevard and Sylvan Street.
Railway carriage used to bring prospective buyers to Van Nuys in 1911

Sunday, April 13, 2014

MUSEUM PREPARES FOR MOVE INTO NORTHRIDGE SPACE

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

On the first of May, The Museum of the San Fernando Valley will move into an exciting new exhibition, meeting and work space. To give the members of his Board of Directors a preview of the facility, Scott Sterling president of The Museum set up work tables, hors d' ouvres, covered the tables with table cloths. 
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 
Plaza De La Cordillera
18860 Nordhoff Street 
2nd Floor 
Northridge, CA 91324 
 
(until May 1st - mailing address)
21031 Ventura Blvd., Suite 419  (mailing address)
Woodland Hills, CA 91364-2230

 Side entrance elevator

 Gary Fredburg arrives for his first meeting at the new Museum space  - side entrance stairs

 Work and Associates space

 Main internal hallway


 Kristine Keller, Board member and Chair of The Museum's "Big Read" project, 
prepares for the first meeting of The Museum in its new spcace.

 Work tables are set up in the main room.


 Left: Jerry Fecht, Willard Simms, Lee Davis, (guest Dick Ashnault of High Tech Signs and Banners_ Mel Mitchell and Roger Dolin.


Scott Sterling shows Lee Davis the main office area.

Mel Mitchell, Treasurer of The Museum, envisions how the patio will look and be used.

Office library with patio access.





THE MUSEUM’S TELEPHONE
1 (818) 347-9665

THE MUSEUM'S EMAILS
gerald.fecht@TheMuseumSFV.org

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

THE MUSEUM’S BLOG

THE MUSEUM’S WEBSITE
www.TheMuseumSFV.org   

Thursday, April 10, 2014

SKY LOUNGE AT LOCKHEED AIR TERMINAL

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 

The memory of Americans dressing up when they flew across the nation is all but gone. And, for most of us the romance flying commercially has vanished as well.

The Sky Lounge, Lockheed Air Terminal, Burbank, California - "America's Most Exciting Aviation Scene." Vintage post card - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2014. (click on image to enlarge it.)

"The Sky Lounge at Lockheed Air Terminal in California is a box seat at one of the nation's outstanding aviation spectacles. Night and day, all types of airplanes - giant Constellations and flashing new military ships - are flying from this great airport, one of the busiest in the nation and center of the giant Lockheed aircraft factories, home of the Lightning P-38, Pi80 Shooting Star and other famous planes."