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Wednesday, March 5, 2014

EARLY VALLEY HISTORICAL SITES ALMOST ALWAYS CONNECTED TO A WATER SUPPLY.

BUILDING A GREAT MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

When the Fernandeño Tatavian  Band of Mission Indians came to the San Fernando Valley, long before Europeans arrived in the New World, they made their encampments near dependable water supplies. Later when the Spaniards and their Mexican allies arrived, they moved aside native populations for the water. Among these sites were Los Encinos State Historical Park and Campo de Cahuenga. A small pond still bubbles at Los Encinos. 

"Blacksmith Shop" Los Encinos State Historical Park - Encino - vintage post card - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2014 - (click on image to enlarge it)  

Many Valley residents believe this structure, now called the Blacksmith's Shop, was the first secular home built in the San Fernando Valley. Ghost hunters are convinced that the building is haunted and that a man who had been evicted from the site was found hanged from a roof beam here.

 Courtyard of Campo de Cahuenga - vintage post card - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2014 - (click on image to enlarge it) 

The banks of the Los Angeles River moved north over the years but a bridge over the Los Angeles River near Campo de Cahuenga on Lankershim Avenue still reminds us of why native people's made their homes nearby.

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