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Thursday, July 8, 2010

HONEY PRODUCTION A LASTING PART OF SAN FERNANDO VALLEY HISTORY

2010 THE YEAR OF VALLEY ADVENTURES

Honey Bee Culture - Rancho Los Encinos - date unknown - detail from gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Marc Wanamaker 2010 (click on image to enlarge)

Mentioned in early Spanish accounts of the Tongva people, who resided for centuries in the San Fernando Valley, was their love of honey and its importance to their culture. Honey, prior to the introduction of cane and beet sugar, was the primary sweetening agent in the era of Spanish ranchos. European honeybees were critical to the development of the California citrus industry and enabled early American settlers to produce great orchards of apricots and peaches.


Suggesting the curative properties of raw honey, La Miel Jireh of 12915 San Fernando Road in Symar, sells a variety of honeys including flavors influenced by orange, sage and wild flower. The Spanish word "miel" means honey. The name arrived in Iberia with the Roman conquest and came to Rome from the ancient Greeks. Mil indicates sweetness, hence women's names like Melissa. Check out La Miel Jireh at www.lamieljireh.com

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

1 comment:

Evelia said...

i love la miel Jireh they also have raw royal jelly and fresh bee pollen for those that sufer from allergies everything the bee make they have it's a cute elegant little honey shop.