Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

www.TheMuseumSFV.org




Sunday, March 31, 2013

A SPECIAL VIEW OF LANKERSHIM BOULEVARD

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY             2013


Studio City - Postcard - Gift of Gary Fredburg to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley  2013
(click on image to enlarge it.)  "Panoramic view of part of the San Fernando Valley from hills (south) overlooking the Hollywood Freeway at Lankershim Boulevard. Universal City Studios may be seen on the right."

Your $ 25 gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley allows the purchase, documentation and preservation of 5 to 7 vintage postcards for the permanent collections of The Museum. Historic postcards average from $ 10 to $ 25. Donations of postcards, and postcard collections, from Glendale, Burbank, San Fernando, Calabasas and the suburbs of Los Angeles in the Valley are tax deductible.


The Museum of the San Fernando Valley
21031 Ventura Blvd., Suite 419
Woodland Hills, CA 91364-2230

THE MUSEUM’S TELEPHONE
1 (818) 347-9665

THE MUSEUM'S EMAILS
gerald.fecht@TheMuseumSFV.org
info@TheMuseumSFV.org
THE MUSEUM’S BLOG
THE MUSEUM’S WEBSITE
www.TheMuseumSFV.org

A 1969 EASTER GREETING FROM GRANDPA

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY            2013

     44 years ago, a loving grandpa sent his Easter greeting to the Ford Family on Gager Street in Pacoima California. On April 1st, he wrote:
      "Hi Fellows; this is no April First joke.  I wish you all a pleasant and lively Easter season. May not see you until after Easter. Keep busy. Love Grandpa." 

Grandpa's affectionate postcard now includes his thoughts in the permanent history of the San Fernando Valley.


HAPPY EASTER FROM YOUR MUSEUM

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY       2013

 1890 Easter Card - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2010.
Your Museum collects and preserves artifacts of holidays celebrated in the San Fernando Valley. 

1930 Easter Card - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2010.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Northridge Village Art Show - Coming May 18




The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's Public Art Initiative and Northridge Sparkle 
have teamed up to promote art through the history of Northridge. 

The idea behind the show is to go back in time through the artisit's eyes. What was it like to live in the valley 50 years ago? 100 years ago? Who were the people that first settled and lived in Norhridge? Where do the street names and towns come from? 



Join us at the Northridge Village Art Show and fundraiser on Saturday, May 18th at the JR Gallery and experience history in an artistic form. 

A portion of the the proceeds raised will go toward the beautification efforts on Reseda Blvd. in Northridge Village. 

Cost: $15 Donation 
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Location: JR Gallery
8906 Reseda Blvd
Northridge, CA 

Appetizers will be provided by Lum-Ka-Naad (thia food)
Music by guitarist Guy Guilbert

For more information contact Roger at roger@muralenvironments.com or Andrea at northridgebeautification@gmail.com


Thursday, March 28, 2013

CONGRATULATIONS SCOTT STERLING NEW PRESIDENT OF THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY                  2013



Congratulations to Scott Sterling of Northridge, California, newly elected
 President of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley!



A message from Scott:

As The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's new President, I offer greetings to everyone that lives, works and plays in the fantastic San Fernando Valley.   

As a lifelong resident of the Valley, I have seen big changes, both good and bad.  I am a third generation builder in the valley and my family has a long history here. My purpose, as an involved community leader, is to be an advocate to help continue the changes for good and to see that the legacy of my family, here in the Valley, is preserved.

I want to thank The Museum's board members for showing their faith and support by voting for me as their new President.

We are now embarking on the next chapter to grow The Museum into a world-class museum in the San Fernando Valley. The valley is the fifth largest population base in the United States and is worthy of a museum that will support that population and help preserve the Valleys unique heritage.

Friday, March 22, 2013

USEFUL RESOURCE FOR STUDENTS OF SAN FERNANDO VALLEY HISTORY

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY             2013


Bob Lisenby, Board Member of the Campo de Cahuenga Memorial Historical Association has shared with us a very important information site of the Huntington (Library) in Pasadena. Here are some of the values available through the site for historians:
http://www.huntington.org/information/ecppmain.htm
Community historians can study in greater detail the individuals and families who settled California’s first presidios and pueblos
Anthropologists and ethno-historians can examine the settlement patterns of Indians in Alta California and their movement to the missions
Historical demographers can bring greater detail to their attempts to understand the pace and magnitude of Indian population decline in Alta California
Scholars of religion can study the practice and administration of Catholicism in the California missions and the lives of California’s Franciscans
Social historians can study the structure and growth of the missions and the secular communities of Spanish and Mexican California
Genealogists can more easily trace and identify the people who lived in California from 1769 to 1850
Historians of colonial America can more easily incorporate regions and peoples beyond the eastern seaboard into the narrative of our country’s early history, and
Scholars can attain an increased awareness of the tremendous diversity that has long characterized the people of the Golden State and the American Southwest

DAY 13 VENTURA BOULEVARD WALK ENTERS TARZANA

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY         0213

A warm sunny day in the San Fernando Valley as I began the Tarzana segment of my trek along Ventura Boulevard. Here are a few images from Corbin Avenue to Tampa.

 Flying swan - wall of a burrito stand in Tarzana.

 Street side landscaping - Gas station in Tarzana

 World famous Fleetwood Square building in Tarzana

 Tile samples at the entrance of a Tarzana kitchen store.


 Mariachi musician - Sol y Luna - Tarzana, California

 Logo of Sol y Luna Restaurant in Tarzana - the food is as good as its decorations. 

 Carved wooden waiting bench at entrance to Sol y Luna Restaurant in Tarzana.

 Door of Mexican arts and crafts  store adjacent to Sol y Luna restaurant in Tazana.

 Copper decorative urn in front of a Tarzana beauty shop

 Bus Bench Art.

 The Museum's tree in Tarzana - purchased and planted by 
The Museum Community in 2011.
It's doing just fine. 

 Tampa Avenue and Ventura Boulevard - Tarzana

 Saint James Presbyterian Church in Tarzana.

 Window of Recon cutlery and emergency supply store. 19423 Ventura

Military pins - Rincon store in Tazana

CLIO INSPIRES A MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY          2013

     The Sacred Muses were believed of the ancient world to be the source of civilization. It was (or is, if you are so inclined) through their inspiration that "civic harmony" occurs. Most people today believe that the Muses came into western philosophy through the ancient Greeks. However, the Muses have a very good chance of being a much older source of "inspiration" and Indo-European in origin.
    In other words the Muses were ancient in the time of Alexander the Great and Aristotle.

 The Muse Clio
excerpted from The Nine Muses - acrylic on canvas
 San Fernando Valley artist Charles Sherman
The Goddess Project - Los Angeles 1988

     Since we are at the onset of Spring, it is quite appropriate that The Museum Community pays homage to the the spirit Clio, one of the nine Sacred Muses of antiquity. Clio was honored by our ancestors at the beginning of Spring. She is the Muse of History and Memory of things past. Her demi-god son Hyacinth was slain and buried in the earth, to burst forth in life symbolized by the spring blossoms of the hyacinth and iris, at the vernal equinox.
    The inspiration found in the history of the San Fernando Valley, when uncovered in its richness will most assuredly add to the civic harmony of our great city. If you agree, we'd like to hear from you.
   Jerry Fecht      818-347-9665   The Museum of the San Fernando Valley

MORE IMAGES FROM CHALK HILL

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY         2013

On day 11 of my walking trek from Calabasas to the Cahuenga Pass, I took these images from the top of historic Chalk Hill. I just now found them, and hope you will agree that they should be included in the documentation of my adventure.

 This structure is being built at the site of the historic Valley Music Center on Chalk Hill.

 The top of Chalk Hill in Woodland Hills

 Half-timbered office building at the summit of Chalk Hill. (click on images to enlarge them.)


REACHING THE MUSEUM


At present, The Museum of the San Fernando Valley does not have an exhibit space. Under the leadership of our newly elected President, Scott Sterling, we are working hard at it.


The Museum of the San Fernando Valley
21031 Ventura Blvd., Suite 419
Woodland Hills, CA 91364-2230

THE MUSEUM’S TELEPHONE
1 (818) 347-9665

THE MUSEUM'S EMAILS
gerald.fecht@TheMuseumSFV.org
info@TheMuseumSFV.org
THE MUSEUM’S BLOG
THE MUSEUM’S WEBSITE
www.TheMuseumSFV.org

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

A MANIFESTO FOR MURALS

“A Manifesto for Murals” – Panel Discussion at The Madrid Theatre
 “A Manifesto for Murals” discussion panel event will be held on Tuesday, April 16th from 7 - 9 pm.  Doors will open at 6:30 pm.  Panelists will be Kent Twitchell (the godfather of L.A. murals), Judy Baca (Executive Director and Founder of Social and Public Art Resource Center – SPARC) , Cheech Marin (actor, producer, avid collector of Chicano art and a huge mural supporter), Levi Ponce (upcoming Chicano mural artist whose art has turned Pacoima into  an outdoor gallery), Isabel Rojas-Williams (Executive Director of Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles), and Felicia Filer (Director of the Public Art Division for the Department of Cultural Affairs, City of Los Angeles). The panel discussion will be moderated by founder of The Museum. Dr. Gerald Fecht.

This is happening at The Madrid Theatre in Canoga Park.  The event is free but donations will be requested.  This is a history making event as the Valley has never organized anything like this before. 

 Sponsored by The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, the Public Art Initiative, the San Fernando Valley Arts Council and the Valley Arts Alliance.  Volunteers for the event are being sought.  Please contact Roslyn Wolin at roslyn@sfvartscouncil.com

Friday, March 15, 2013

CHATSWORTH PHARMACY

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY                 2013

Gary Fredburg, the Museum's largest contributor of historic paper memorabilia to our archives, never ceases to amaze us with his discoveries of Valley historical materials. Here's a "Seasons Greetings" holiday card from a bygone time in Chatsworth.
"Chatsworth Drug Store building, owned by McIntyrs for a while - Corner Devonshire & Topanga."

Chatsworth Pharmacy - historic postcard - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2013.  (click on image to enlarge it.)

Thursday, March 14, 2013

NEW OLD IMAGES OF THE MISSION SAN FERNANDO

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY                       2013

The Mission San Fernando Rey de EspaƱa has many reasons for being viewed as a major treasure in our community. Founded as a bastion of empire of Spain, the mission brought Catholic Christianity to our region of Southern California, was secularized by the government of an independent Mexico, was scouted by Kit Carson, allowed to fall into ruin by Andreas Pico as an adjunct to his rancho, provided an overnight retreat  for the leader of the world's Catholics Pope John Paul II, and continues to this day in both historic and modern roles. 

Cemetery of the Mission San Fernando Rey c. 1895 - historic postcard - gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2013.  (click on image to enlarge it.)

This "Santo Campo," seen here in a neglected state, continues its original function today as Mission Cemetery. Very near this ancient burial site, the beloved performer Bob Hope and Dolores Hope are buried.
 Travelers in covered wagons at the Mission San Fernando c. 1895.  Excerpted from a booklet entitled the Fabulous San Fernando Valley published by Western Federal Savings - date unknown.  Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2013. (click on image to enlarge it - and view section of the photograph below.)



"The only known existing photograph of a San Fernando Mission Indian Woman"  Fabulous San Fernando Valley published by Western Federal Savings - date unknown.  Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2013. (click on image to enlarge it.)

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

DAY 12 AN ART DISCOVERY ON VENTURA BOULEVARD

CHERISHING OUR VALLEY          2013

Chalk Hill, seen in the background of William Howard Taft High School in Woodland Hills, once was a very important source of limestone and lime for the San Fernando Valley. Stone was mined here to line the still existing warm water pool at Los Encinos Historical Monument in Encino.  Winnetka Street seen here was named for a religious agricultural community in the early 1900s.


Taft High School at the corner of Ventura and Winnetka in Woodland Hills.

 Taft High School students board an east bound bus.

The celebration of the Persian spring festival Nowruz is an idea time to visit one of the many San Fernando Valley's Iranian-American restaurants and markets. This section of Woodland Hills has many Persian businesses.

 Woodland Hills Market specializes in Persian and Middle Eastern products.

 Persian cafes, bars and bakeries abound in Woodland Hills



 A traditional Persian baker at Woodland Hills Market

Is it a massage parlor or children's dentist? - a Persian accident attorney advertises above Hank's Tires a San Fernando Valley icon.


 If you care as much about art, as the does The Museum Community, you must visit Art Departure Gallery in Woodland Hills. Go to its website at www.artdeparture.net to get an idea of what I am talking about.
I visited Art Departure while a class of elementary age students was in session, so I didn't want to distract the proprietor/teacher who was just amazing. One boy, who was exploding with creative energy, was talking about how much his hated school - yet, it was highly evident that he loved making art!

 Since I did not have their parents' permission, I didn't photograph the teacher or her pupils, but the evidence of their creativity was everywhere - a sunami of energy and color. The great Swiss artist Paul Klee once said, "I have worked my entire life, trying to learn how to paint like a child."

 Dragon

 If these walls at Art Departure could speak, we might hear the message loud and clear, "Why have the arts, in a Valley that makes its living on the creativity of the entertainment industry, been excluded from the curriculum of our public schools?



One needs to look no further at Art Departure than its workspace, to see its huge contribution to the lives of the children who take classes here.

 Have you made art today?


 Street side garden at Hank's Tires


Comic Book Store