Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

www.TheMuseumSFV.org




Thursday, February 26, 2009

SAN FERNANDO DRAG STRIP

San Fernando Drag Strip decal - Gift to the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gary Fredburg 2009- (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History
The San Fernando Drag Strip was located on Glen Oaks Boulevard - a mile west of Van Nuys Boulevard in the City of San Fernando. The importance of San Fernando Valley "car culture" is a major interest of your Museum's Contemporary Culture collection and study.

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is seeking representatives from the City of San Fernando for The Museum's Board and for Community Committees.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, February 23, 2009

THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY RECEIVES HOLY CARD ART COLLECTION


Saint George Defeating the Dragon Demon - "Holy Card" The Museum of the San Fernando Valley Religious Art and Artifacts Collection (click on image to enlarge) Saint George is the patron saint of Greece and the United Kingdom.
Saint Martin of Tours - "Holy Card" The Museum of the San Fernando Valley Religious Art and Artifacts Collection (click on image to enlarge)
Saint Martin was a Roman soldier who converted to Christianity and was elected bishop of Tours, France. Saint Martin in the Fields Episcopal Church in Winnetka is named after his patronage.
Our Lady of Montserrat "Holy Card" The Museum of the San Fernando Valley Religious Art and Artifacts Collection (click on image to enlarge)
Much beloved image of an ancient icon in Catalonia.

PANORAMA CITY "B.I.D." APPROVED

1979 faded mural of bathing beauties at Venice Beach - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. (click on image to enlarge)

The following is an excerpt from the Panorama City Neighborhood Council's PANORAM PRIDE newsletter for February 22, 2009

On Tuesday, February 10, the (Los Angeles) City Council voted in favor of a proposal for a Panorama City Business Improvement District. Ballots from property owners were then opened and counted in a room at city hall. Owners with 72 % of the BID's assessment value voted in favor of the BID. The next day, the council approved an ordinance creating the BID. The Mayor signed it on February 19.
A BID is created by local businesses or property owners to tax themselves for funds to improve their business area. The Panorama City BID is the result of a four-year effort led by Cesar De La Cruz of Agora Realty. He and Sean Hashem of Y2K Capital/Valley Gateway Building co-chair the formation committee. The next step is creation of a non-profit corporation to manage the tax funds. Funds will be used for sidewalk cleanup, landscape maintenance, increased security, and the arts.
The BID is a prerequisite for an investment of $4.5 million by the city's Community Redevelopment Agency in a major streetscape project for the central business district. The CRA project will install new sidewalk treatments and furniture, street trees, crosswalks, and "Welcome" signs at five entry points to the district. Hear more about the BID at the PCNC Commerce commitee meeting Tuesday, March 10, 2:30 p.m. at Wells Fargo Bank, 8548 Van Nuys Bd.

MAUDI GRAS BEGINS TONIGHT - MUSEUM BOARDS MEET WEDNESDAY

YMCA Indian Guides Pow Wow Pierce College 1979 - slide Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Tomorrow more pancake mix is used than at any other time of the year. American Episcopalian Christians often hold pancake dinners on Fat Tuesday (Maudi Gras) the day before Shrove-Tide. Catholics and Greek Christians enter a penitential season called Lent this coming Wednesday. Communities with Irish and English heritages serve up big sausage dinners (Banger-Tide) tonight and especially tomorrow.
Traveling monks called Shrivers traveled throughout Europe during Lent accepting the confessions of the guilty.
In Venice a great Carnival is going on as you read this, and massive samba parades in Mobile, Alabama - New Orleans and Rio will rock the world for 72 hours. After tomorrow, meat eating is curtailed - hence "Carne - Vale".
Tonight is masking night. Beads are lucky to give and receive during the Maudi Gras.

The mask above was made from a Baskin Robbins ice cream container in 1979 by a father and son involved in the YMCA's Indian Guides program. 2009 - The Year of Valley History

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

THE BATTLE OF IWO JIMA REMEMBERED BY A SAN FERNANDO VALLEY VETERAN

Scrapbook Clipping 1845 - Mexico, Missouri - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

The following is a handwritten account by the late James L. Fecht.

"One of the guys in our outfit was killed by rifle fire and we buried him in a shallow grave and stuck his rifle with a bayonet on it in the ground with his helmet and dog-tags on to mark the grave sit as we moved on up thru the lines. After the fight was over two of us wee sent back to bring his body back to a grave registration outfit. On the way back I was walking ahead and tripped a booby trap wire that was hooked to a grenade in a small scrub tree just at the height of my head. My buddy hit the deck behind me but I sensed it was too late for me, so I just stood there cursing my luck with the grenade went off and I realized it was just a Jap phosphorous grenade that was used to light up the area at night to see anyone passing that way. I was a nervous wreck for several days after that.
A Jap artillery shell hit a bluff about 10 yards form my buddy and me as we were dug in a fox hole below. When it went off it covered us with dirt and dust. a pill box 200 yards ahead of us knew we were there and kept us pinned down with a lite Nambu machine gun until a tank moved us and silenced them.
We could not sleep for the first few nites but then exhaustion crept in and we could take times sleeping while one kept watch, the other slept, even with the shells bursting all around.
Our secret to advancement was overpowering fire power. Continuous bombardment with all we had. Once we moved past the first airfield, we were able to bring in rocket launchers, artillery and tanks to help us progress. The well fortified pill boxes of reinforced concrete covered with dirt were our biggest problem. They were so placed that they covered each other's flanks. As a tank would move in toward me it would be knocked out by an unseen pill box from its flank firing 47 m.m. anti-tank high explosive shells. We had to take extra caution while going in with a tank as these shells burst all around us.
One pill box had us pinne down with machine gun fire so we couldn't cross an open spot to get to it, and one our guys an Indian boy from Montana by the name of Mix crawled almost 100 yards under the fire and lobbed a grenade thru the port hole slit in the pill box, killing all inside and letting advance another 100 yards. I think he got the silver star for that action but I never heard for sure.
Almost two thirds of the way up the Island we were paired off in twos in our sandy fox holes and a one guy kept watch the other could sleep. Our sleep was forever getting interrupted by someone slipping along crawling toward our supplies of food and water, and by the eerie light of our flares -shooting was sporadic all night. Toward the end though we would be rushed by groups of 10, 20 and 100 trying to break out resulting in viscous fire fights.
One day my buddy from New York, Homer Davis and I got pinned down and couldn't get out of our fox hole. The Japs were firing all the mortars and rockets they had left and were keeping us pinned down. All we had to eat was canned cheese. We ate cheese for two days.
We had a wicked fire fight one night about 2 AM. About 400 Japs charge thru a thicket of small trees just ahead of us right at our front line. The brunt of the chare hit the 4th Marines on our right and almost a 100 headed into us. We fired at every shadow from the flares overhead for about 2 hours and then it tapered off to just an occasional burst of fire here and there. Next daylight we scouted on up three trees and saw dead bodies stacked up like cord wood in front of us. The closest in front of me had a beautiful cow hide pack and a Jap flag inside his helmet. I still have his pack but lost the flag after all these years.
We followed the flame-throwers on up the Island as they fired into the hundreds of caves, and we fired as they scrambled out of their holes like ants.
When we reached the farthest point of the Island all organized resistance was over and it was just mopping up and blowing up the caves and pill boxes. Our company captain gave me a dispatch case with information on all the guys in our outfit that had been killed or wounded and was told to catch the first boat going back to Guam and deliver the information to our Regimental Headquarters back there.
I caught a LCVI (Landing Craft Vehicle Infarty?) and we sailed back to Guam. I caught a ride with a truck headed over to the other side of the island where our rear echelon was still in camp. The truck let me off at the front of a palm grove and I started walking back up to our tent city. When the group that were left behind in our rear echelon saw me coming up the road alone a cry went up and the guys came running down the road to meet me saying, "Where is the rest of the outfit?" "Are you the only one left Fecht?" "We've been listening to the battle on the radio, did everyone else get killed?" It took me a few minutes to quiet them down and reassure them that most of our buddies made it ok.
The Battle of Iwo Jima gave me enough combat points to gain a furlough back in the Sates and home for awhile. I spent the next three weeks saying goodbye to all my buddies and the native families that I had met there on Guam."

Friday, February 20, 2009

MEMORIES OF A SAN FERNANDO VALLEY VETERAN OF IWO JIMA 65 YEARS AGO

Clipping from WWII scrapbook kept in Mexico, Missouri - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2009

Memoirs of James L. Fecht - 3rd Marine Division - WWII - Lifelong San Fernando Valley resident
"After a few months of relaxation after the Guam landing, we began training for our next objective. Tokyo Rose, who usually knew somehow about where we were going next, began broadcasting from Japan that our 3rd Marine Division was going to make a landing in Okinawa and that most of us would be killed. She was really wrong on that one, as we were headed for Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands.
Our 3rd marine Division was met with the 4th Division from Hawaii and the 5th Division from Saipan and at sea. We rendezvoused with an escort of destroyers and various battleships along with an ominous pair of red cross hospital ships that gave us the willies.
We listened to the bombardment by sea and air thru our attack troop ship radio and learned of our destination. We studied maps and held school on the battle plan which didn't hold much imagination for such a tiny island. The plan was for the 5th Division to land first and head straight across the island, the 4t Div. was to land second and go up the right side of the island and then our 3rd Division was to land and go up the center of the island, with the 5th on our left and the 4th on our right.
I dug in the soft sand and looked up at the volcano Mount Suribachi that commanded all the high ground let them look right down our throats.
Destroyers, battleships, cruisers and small gun boats pounded away at the mountain and dive bombers blasted them from above, but just the minute the dust would clear for a second, out of a cave would poke a shore battery gun and cut loose at the ships and down along our beach."

Clipping from WWII scrapbook kept in Mexico, Missouri - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2009

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

MUSEUM BOARDS MEET ON FEB. 25TH 2009

Cupid's Hot Dog Anniversary - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Gary Fredburg 2009 - Image by Stan Cline (click on image to enlarge)
Cupid's has been a favorite hot dog stand in the San Fernando Valley since 1946.

The Board of Directors and Board of Advisors of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley will meet on

February 25,, 2009
Executive Committee: 5 PM until 6 PM
Full Board Meeting: 6 PM until 8 PM

Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley Building
5121 Van Nuys Blvd # 200
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

Information: 1 (818) 347-9665

VETERANS BUILT THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY IN THE 1950s AND 60s

Photograph of Iwo Jima (click on image to enlarge) Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley

The veterans who returned to the United States to make the San Fernando Valley their home at the conclusion of WWII did not leave behind their wounds, physical and psychological. James Fecht was a U.S. Marine who fought on Iwo Jima with the 3rd Marine Division. The following is an excerpt from his war memoirs.
In the final years of his life, Jim began a series of acrylic paintings of the places where he had fought. He painted all of the locations at peace. It took him a lifetime to work through the terrors he had experienced in combat.

page 98

"Things started heating up about 200 yard ahead of us in the scrub trees and volcanic rocks, a firefight was definitely moving our way. Homer Davis, a farm boy from Middlefield, New York and I were huddled up as deep as we could get in a shell hold, in the light volcanic sand, about 20 yards from the edge of the scub trees.
The unmistakable crackling of light Namu machine gun fire, and the popping of their rifle fire, kept coming our way, and we knew that we would soon be in for it. Mortar shells were dropping in on us, ahead of their advancing troops, keeping us pinned down in our holes.
Every time a shell exploded nearby, the light sand would shift back down in our hole, keeping us busy shoveling it out again. We took turns immediately after a shell burst, to stick our heads up to take a peek at what was coming our way, and then report to the other what we thought was coming in.
At my lst sighting it appeared to me that the shells were bursting further behind us, which meant that their troops were getting closer to us. I also note that their small arms fire was moving a little further to our right into the 4th Marines on our right flank.
Our Battalion's plan on defending or advancing was always to lay down a withering stream of fire, and the time had come to defend our position against their counter attack. They were too close for our artillery or Naval or Air support, so that left it up to each of us to throw everything we had at them.
On all sides of us, all up and down the line, small arms fire began popping and cracking, and with the explosions of grenades and mortar shell, it sounded like the biggest Fourth of July you've ever heard.

page 99

It was pretty late in the afternoon and with the sun going down, we were sure that their main charge would come after dark. Their counter attacks always came after they moved up close to our positions during the day, then came in on us at night.
Our old Marine Gunner McGrew, a 20 year veteran who we would follow anywhere, came crawling into our hole with bandoliers of 30 caliber ammo clips for our rifles, and bags of grenades. He told us to keep our fire all night, but to fire from different positions so as not to give our locations away.
Homer crawled about 5 yards to the left and I crawled 5 years to the right, were we dug a couple more foxholes in the sand to give us a couple of more firing positions. We would fire into the scrub trees ahead whenever we thought we saw something moving. And, the rest of our battalion were doing the same thing.
As it got dark, one of our destroyers moved in close to shore, and started shooting off flares that lit up the area in an eerie light as they slowly drifted to the ground. In the dust and smoke from exploding shells rising up in the brush and scrub trees, limbs were being cut off from the murderous fire. Shadowy figures darting between rocks and trees drew a stream of fir from a dozen different directions.
When the sand started kicking up in my face, I realized that there was incoming fire too. I could hear the whizzing over my head that sounded like bees buzzing by. The Gunner came crawling by, dragging more bandoliers of ammo from hole to hole.

page 100

The firing in front of us died down about 2 A.M., but it sounded like the 4th (division) on our right flank were still getting it. They were in afire fight and were getting mortar shells dropped in on them too. The shelling lasted only about a half hour, but there was to be no sleep that night, as small bands of three or four charged our lines all night. The tension in the darkness was sheer terror and left us all exhausted as first light of dawn filtered through the dust and fog.
Homer and I took turns cat-napping and keeping watch back in our big sandy hole together. Lieutenant Rink crawled over to us and passed the word that we were to move out right away, and move up 100 yards and dig in there. We strapped our packs on, loaded up our cartridge belts with ammo, hooked on all the grenades we could carry, then crawled out of our holes.
About 20 feet to my left, a big ex-Pro football player named Gurley, lay slumped over the edge of his foxhole. I thought he was just asleep, and I crawled over to wake him and to get him to come with us. That's when I noticed his mouth and nose were buried right down in the sand. It looked like somewhere during the night he must have raised up to fire, a small piece of shrapnel hit him right in the heart. Our Navy Corpsman, Doc Wilson, got my signal and crawled over to take at look at him, but there was nothing he could do.

page 101

As we made our way up to our new position, we encountered dead enemy bodies about 20 yards in front of us. That's how close they had gotten to us. When I poked one with my bayonet to make sure he was dead, his helmet fell off, and I found some letters, pictures, and a regimental flag up on the inside straps of his helmet. I stuffed them into the pockets of my dungarees, and moved on.
As we got further into the scrub trees, we found dead bodies all over the place, some places they were stacked on top of each other. They had charged right into our murderous firepower. Some of the guys were shooting into the corpses, taking no chance that some might be alive.
The Artillery, Naval and Air bombardment ahead of us, churned up the landscape until it looked like all the pictures of hell I had ever seen. s the barrage moved on up ahead of us, we came out of the little scrub trees into a small clearing, where we stopped and started digging in, and not a bit too soon! a machine gun opened up from a concrete pill box about 200 yards ahead of us, spraying lead all across the front lines. When bullets started kicking up dust all around you, and clipping off the leaves from bushes right near your head, you can dig a hole pretty fast.
A take was called up to knock out the pill box that was pinning us down, and as it swung into the clearing, and started firing at the emplacement with armor piercing shells, some of those shells ricocheted off the concrete and bounced end over right over our heads adding to our peril.

page 102

The tank maneuvered in closer to the pill box to get within its flame thrower range, when all of the sudden it was hit by a high explosive shell from another buried pill box on its flank. The tank was completely immobilized and started burning. A couple of the tank crew got out of the tank and started running town our lines, but both bunkers opened up on them and cut them down.
About 20 yards on my right, an Indian boy from South Dakota, by the name of Mix, stripped off his pack, cartridge belt and canteens, loaded up the pockets of his dungarees with grenades, grabbed his rifle and took off on a dead run toward the bunker, about 200 yards of open ground.
I don't think they saw him because the smoke from the burning tank, because he never drew any fire at all. He ran around to the back of the dirt mound that covered the concrete pill box and started throwing in grenades one after the other, as fast as he could pull the pins. When the dust cleared Mix waved at us and yell that it was all clear. There were 4 dead bodies in the bunker and Lieutenant Rinka said we could more up past there tomorrow.
After the campaign of Iwo Jima was over, we returned to our base on Guam, where Mix was awarded the Silver Star for his outstanding bravery. "

South Pacific at Peace Series by James L. Fecht (click on image to enlarge) Acrylic painting completed in 1997. Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009

Monday, February 16, 2009

ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS OF WOMEN EXHIBIT OPENS IN SAN FERNANDO

Artistic Expressions of Women

You are cordially invited to experience the 15th exhibit at the San Fernando Museum of Art and History
519 So. Brand Boulevard San Fernando, CA

Opened Sunday, February 8, 2009 through Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Admission to the Museum is Free!
¡Entrada al museo es Gratis!

Paintings, drawings, photographs, original music and other artistic expressions by women, including Socorro Barrutia, Cynthia Alarcón, Violeta Quintero, Imelda Gomez,
Pauline Ruddock and others.

This is a museum and cultural arts center that was created to promote the cultural arts in the historic San Fernando area: visual art, music, dance, drama, poetry…

For information, call: Wed. through Sun. 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. (818) 838-6360
Public parking available on Hollister Street, off of Brand Blvd.

BODY DECORATION - IS IT ART

Moorpark College Student's Tattoo 1996 - photo by Gerald Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
Hi Museum Folks
Now that I have your opinions going about Neon as Art, here's another challenge. What do you think about body decoration in the form of tattoos, body piercing, scarring and other intrusions on the natural human form as "art." Since The Museum of the San Fernando Valley has both a historical and cultural mission, we can always defend our collections of body art images as anthropological - but, is it art?

Saturday, February 14, 2009

VALENTINE'S DAY PAGAN AND CHRISTIAN

Cupid Shoots His Arrow on Valentine's Day - historic postcard - gift to the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Fred Berk 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
February 14 has been the Feast of Love from very, very ancient times. At the first inkling of Spring, our ancestors celebrated the coming re-birth of the Earth and its vegetation in the month of Februs (spirit of love-making). Today is the Feast of Eros, little God of love. Called Cupid by the Romans, he was worshipped as the offspring of the Goddess of love Venus or Aphrodite and the virile God of war, Lord Ares or Mars.
The Christian deacon-priest Valentine was supposedly imprisoned for his beliefs by the Romans. From his cell Valentino sent messages assuring his flock of Christ's abiding love. His message became known as Valentines. You can bet that Hallmark won't let us forget the Festival of Love in the foreseeable future.

Friday, February 13, 2009

BELOVED EDUCATOR ROBERT LELAND DIES

Dr. Robert Leland - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
When Bob Leland retired as the principal of Burbank High School, he continued his lifelong dedication to youth by acting as a child advocate in the courts. No one who knew Dr. Leland was surprised.
Few people worked harder at their jobs than Bob Leland. He presided over Burbank High School and its then new continuation school throughout the 1960s. He watched his staff form a chapter of the American Federation of Teachers, his students become fans of the Beatles, an ever-increasing list of Burbank graduates fall in Vietnam, and the kids of Burbank reject small town conservatism to become flower children. Somehow through his sincerity and sense of fair play, Bob Leland kept his school afloat. Dr. Leland died on the 22nd of December 2008. He was proceeded in death by his wife Pearl Leland, retired professor of nursing from Los Angeles Valley College. Bob was a good man.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

ARLENE BERNHOLTZ RECEIVES CALABASAS CHAMBER AWARD

Arlene Bernholtz Named Calabasas Chamber’s
Bill Van Gieson Memorial Award Winner

Arlene Bernholtz, past Marketing Director of the Calabasas Chamber of Commerce was recently named the 2009 recipient of the prestigious “Bill Van Gieson Memorial Award.” The award Selection Committee made up of Chamber past presidents and past chairmen of the board bestowed the award to Bernholtz who directed the Calabasas Chamber’s membership development for 13 years and who helped build the Chamber into one of the most successful business alliances in the region. Since her retirement in 2007, Arlene continues her numerous philanthropic, historical, cultural and community endeavors with the time retirement allows.

The “Bill Van Gieson Memorial Award” was created to “reflect the pioneering spirit, exceptional initiative and outstanding contributions to the Calabasas community in memory of Bill Van Gieson, who is remembered for his creative leadership in developing Calabasas Chamber of Commerce activities. Bernholtz is a native Californian and affiliated with the Calabasas Historical Society – Past President and Charter Member; Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society – Board Member; California Conference of Historical Societies – Regional Vice President; L.A. County Deputy Registrar – Election Division Precinct Board Member; and Love on 4 Paws - Pet Therapy Volunteer at West Hills Hospital & Medical Center. A little unknown fact is that she is also an avid Mercedes Club enthusiast!

Calabasas Chamber President and CEO, Carol Washburn stated that, “Arlene’s greatest attributes are her respect for history, and her boundless energy and love for and appreciation of others. She works from the heart to provide opportunities for people to succeed in all walks of life.”

The award commenced in 1993; it’s first honoree was Kay Beachy followed by: John & Juliana Gensley, Barbara Reinike, Dr. Albert Marley, Bob McCord, Mac & Alice Stelle, Karyn Foley, Dennis Washburn, Ray Phillips, Phyllis Power, Wally and Jean Hollenstein, Flo Klein, Frank and Betty Farmer, Lee Cohen (Pioneer Legacy Award), Bob Hill, John Boething and Rodger Sterling.

Arlene will be honored at the Chamber’s January 30th Monte Carlo Night & Installation Gala scheduled for 6:00 p.m. until Midnight at the City of Calabasas Library in Founders Hall. Chamber members and the public are invited to attend. Reservations can be made by calling (818)222-5680.

AUTHOR! AUTHOR! PHYLLIS HANSEN WRITES A BOOK ALL ABOUT CHARMS - JUST IN TIME FOR VALENTINE'S DAY

(click on image to enlarge)
On their way to Brighton Collectibles Stores, and retail locations that sell Brighton accessories across America, a terrific coffee table book called Charmed is now available. Written by Phyllis Hansen, a Board Member of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, the book tells everything you might want to know and more about the charms of today and yesteryear.

To make the book even more fun, there is full page color photo of an amazing charm bracelet owned by our Museum's religion advisor Liane Schirmer.

(click on image to enlarge)

You can find out where to buy Phyllis Hansen's book by checking: www.brighton.com

SLIDES OF NEON - ART AND CULTURE - PLEASURE AND PAIN

Simple Simon Neon Sign - Photo by Gerald Fecht - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge) 2009 The Year of Valley History
When I began taking pictures of neon signs and art in the 1970s, I did so simply to excite my Moorpark College Humanities students to pay more attention to the world around them. Because, as our Museum Advisor David Quick, would likely tell us, neon is one of the most important forms of modern creative expression. (David is one of the founders of the Museum of Neon Art in Los Angeles). Alas, not thinking that I might someday be working to preserve popular culture and contemporary art as part of the mission of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, I didn't keep very good records of when and where the neon images were photographed.

Sail Fish Neon Sign - Photo by Gerald Fecht - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
I'm pretty sure I took this picture when my wife and I were going to an evening performance of the Gay Men's Chorus at the Alex Theatre in Glendale.
Become an agent for historical and cultural information. If you know where any of these neon images are (or were) located drop The Museum an e-mail: jerry@anchoreducation.com

Female Diver Neon Sign - Photo by Gerald Fecht - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge) 2009 The Year of Valley History
Is neon an appropriate medium for artistic expression? What's your view?


Whisky Jug Neon Sign - Photo by Gerald Fecht - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
Looking at Neon Art is a real pleasure for me. Trying to figure out, where I took the picture is a pain in my record keeping.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

RICHARD HILTON LEADS 2nd NOHO WALKING TOUR FOR THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

NoHo Walking Tour Feb. 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
Undaunted by the first big rains of February, Richard Hilton (Director of The Museum's Tour Programs) met an intrepid group of California in-tourists for The Museum's second NoHo historic walking tour. One of our group came to be with us from Santa Barbara.
2009 - The Year of Valley History
Masonic Temple North Hollywood 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
Richard Hilton added the very impressive neo-Mayan Masonic Temple to the 2nd. walking tour of the Museum. Hilton already has plans to expand the NoHo area tours to include the theater/arts district and a ride to Campo de Cahuenga on the Metro.
Stay tuned.
The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

DWP SLIDES (part 3)

Downtown Los Angeles 1885 - DWP slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 - (click on image to enlarge)
Los Angeles experienced a major economic and building boom with the arrival of the Santa Fe Railroad in the mid 1880s.
2009 - The Year of Valley History

Water ditch - Pershing Square - DWP slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 - (click on image to enlarge)
In its earliest years the Pueblo, then City of Los Angeles, depended on San Fernando Valley water from the Los Angeles River. Such waterways were called zanhas.

Main Street Los Angeles c. 1880 - DWP slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 - (click on image to enlarge)
As Los Angeles grew in the 1880s, it soon became evident that the springs of the San Fernando Valley would not be enough to supply the city's needs.

First office building of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power - DWP slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 - (click on image to enlarge)

DWP SLIDES (part 2)

Posed Zanja Re-enactment - DWP Slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
Water from the Los Angeles River Zanja (water ditch) supplied the original Pueblo of Los Angeles.
2009 - The Year of Valley History

Los Angeles about 100 years after its founding - DWP Slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Los Angeles in 1885 - DWP Slides - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley from Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

10 DWP SLIDES (part 1)

DWP Slide of 1st Sketch of the City of Los Angeles - 1853
- gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
The original use of these slides is unknown, but since they are all water-related, they were likely part of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power presentation packet. The Kodachrome box in which they came has a note referring to other slides (not included) from 1958. The slides themselves are not in a Kodak frame. 2009 - the Year of Valley History
The Los Angeles River that supplied the early settlers in Los Angeles, came from sources in the San Fernando Valley.

DWP Slide of the Water Wheel in the Los Angeles River
- gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
An earlier image of this water wheel was just published on this blog, but this slide image is in color. 2009 - The Year of Valley History

DWP Slide of the First Los Angeles Reservoir - sometime after 1861 - gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Diane McCreary 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
The water in this historic reservoir came mainly from sources in the San Fernando Valley.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history & culture.

MYSTERY PHOTO RELATED TO DEATH VALLEY

Mystery Photo - possibly related to Death Valley - Archives of the Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History
This morning while I was documenting items just donated to our Museum's Library, I found this photograph tucked in a facsimile journal by William Lewis Manly of his survival on a his trek to Los Angeles in 1849. Manly's book is particularly interesting because it gives a first hand account of his desperate journey across Death Valley and the Mojave Desert in the mid-19th Century and what it was like to enter the San Fernando Valley through the Palmdale-Lancaster Pass in 1849. His description of the natural water springs in the San Fernando Valley is riveting.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

SHARE YOUR HISTORICAL ARTIFACTS WITH THE FUTURE - THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

A 'Matchless' Electronic Home - 1939 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
We are still gleaning treasures from the artifacts loaned to the Museum Community by Diane McCreary this week.
Each and every item loaned or donated to your Museum is photographed or scanned, documented and stored both electronically and/or physically by The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. As your Museum grows, this task will grow as well.
Images from small booklets, such as this sales brochure done in 1939, entitled "A Picture Tour Through The 'Matchless' Electric Home - 3956 Wilshire Boulevard", tells us not only what was the state-of-the-art in the use of electricity for a home, but is useful for comparisons with our modern lives. 2009 - The Year of Valley History
Electronic Gate (detail) from A 'Matchless' Electronic Home - 1939 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History
Thinking about a "modern" electric gate from your home? Maybe you are one of those folks marketers call a "slow acceptor"? This is what such a gate looked like in 1939. In 1942 all such residential uses for metal and electrical power were put on hold until after the United States would win the Second World War.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, February 9, 2009

SPECIAL THANKS TO DIANE McCREARY

The Intake Journal 1927 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - (click on image to enlarge)
A note of thanks to Diane McCreary of Studio City for her contributions to this blog of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. Diane works tirelessly on behalf of preserving San Fernando Valley history, especially our priceless Campo de Cahuenga in North Hollywood.
2009 - The Year of Valley history.
The Intake is a journal published by the employees of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. This Volume 4, number 1, was published in Los Angles, January 1927. Its cover features Hilton Lake with Mount Washington in the background. This edition carried a story about John P. Moran who spent over 20 years as an employee of the Department.

IMAGES FROM LOS ANGELES UTILITIES HISTORY

Water Wheel in the Los Angeles River 1859 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
A wooden water wheel lifted precious water from the Los Angeles River into supply ditches in 1859. The river's water began its journey into the city from the San Fernando Valley.
2009 - The Year of Valley History
A Los Angeles Power Station - Bishop, California c. 1920 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
A very small 120 kilowatt generator was the first power station for the city of Los Angeles. It was located just south of the town of Bishop, California in 1909.
2009 - The Year of Valley History

Arrival of Electricity in Los Angeles 1916 - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
Just over 200 customers received the first electricity arriving in Los Angeles in 1916.
2009 - The Year of Valley History

1913 The Cascades of the San Fernando Valley - Collection of Diane McCreary 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
On November 5th, 1913 great cascades of water from the Owens River flowed into the San Fernando Valley, culminating one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. Acquiring and maintaining sources of pure water for the 1,800,000 residents of the San Fernando Valley, and our neighbors throughout Los Angeles and Southern California will always challenge us. Your Museum collects, studies and presents the history of water and power.
2009 - The Year of Valley History

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

NOTES ON JOHN P. MORAN - LOS ANGELES WATER AND POWER 1926

John P. Moran at age 33 - Under Sheriff of Los Angeles 1890 - Collection of Diane McCreary Studio City 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge) 2000 - The Year of Valley History

John P. Moran was born in Los Angeles on July 17, 1857. He was baptized a Christian in the Old Mission Plaza Church in August of that year. Moran attended St. Vincent's school at the east side of Plaza Park. At the age of 18, John Moran was elected to the Los Angeles City Council, and was likely at the age of 21 the youngest elected politician in the country.
Around 1890 Moran became Under-Sheriff of Los Angeles under Sheriff Ed. Gibson. He later worked for the Federal Government in the Internal Revenue Service.
In 1904, John Moran became an administrator for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. He died on December 6, 1926. Because of his splendid beard, Moral was known by Water and Power employees as "The Grizzly Bear."

c. 1926 John P. Moran (driver) and Freeman R. Cady - City vehicle - Collection of Diane McCreary Studio City 2009 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)

Thanks to Diane McCreary of Studio City for this information and photos of James Moran.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Sunday, February 8, 2009

THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AND PUBLIC SAFETY

Detail ceramic mural of Fire Fighters - Encino - 2009 - Photo by Gerald Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History
The historical and modern practices of public safety organizations is a major area of interest for The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. The Museum will work to bring the history and modern issues facing the Los Angeles City and County Fire Departments to the 1,800,000 residents of the San Fernando Valley.
If you have an interest in Fire Fighting history, contact your Museum today - 1 (818) 347-9665

SALOMI RESTAURANT IN THE NOHO CHECKS OUT THE MUSEUM'S NO HO HISTORIC WALKING TOUR

Manager of the Salomi Restaurant in North Hollywood 2009 - photo by Jerry Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

2009 - The Year of Valley History
As our February 7th walking tour headed south on Lankershim Boulevard, we encountered the manager of the Salomi Restaurant cleaning his windows just before opening for the Saturday lunch trade. With an open charm he asked, "what's up with all these people?" We explained that the group was a walking tour of historic North Hollywood.
"When you are finished, you'll have to come back for a great lunch," he smiled.
Before our next walking adventure in the NoHo, the Museum's tour committee will be contacting restaurants in the area to offer our in-tourists an incentive to stay for lunch. In the meanwhile, the manager of Salomi gave us a take-out menu for The Museum's archives. He was particularly interested in The Museum when he learned that we would be conducting regular tours in the area, and that The Museum exists not only to serve individuals and communities but businesses as well.
Salomi Indian and Bangladesh Restaurant has been a part of the San Fernando Valley for 25 years. Since 1979 it has offered traditional Indian and Tanoori style meals. It is open seven days a week.
Salomi Restaurant
5225 Lankershim Boulevard
North Hollywood, CA
1 (818) 506-0130

Air Conditioning Worker, North Hollywood 2009 - photo by Jerry Fecht for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
When I was taking the photo of the manager of the Salomi Restaurant, a young working man and his friend said, "Hey, take my picture too!". When I asked where he worked he pointed to the building now behind him in this photograph. I explained to him that he and his family are important to our culture and that The Museum of the San Fernando Valley belongs to him.
"Hey," he responded, "thanks!"
The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the world, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

SPECIAL THANKS TO REV. DOCTOR MICHAEL WOODCOCK

Interior First Baptist Church of North Hollywood 2009 - (click on image to enlarge)

2009 - The Year of Valley History
The Director of tours for The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, Richard Hilton arranged for a special addition to the walking adventure on February 7th. Undaunted adventurers who defied a day of rainstorms got to meet the Rev. Doctor Michael Woodcock, who lead our Valley in-tourists on a personal tour of the interior of the First Baptist Church of North Hollywood.
Here Rev Woodcock is silhouetted against the great window at the front of the church erected in 1925.

First Baptist Church of North Hollywood
11210 Otsego Street
North Hollywood CA 91601-3770

Telephone (818) 763-4356

Fax (818) 763-4357
info@fbcnoho.org

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Center of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Saturday, February 7, 2009

IDEAS SOUGHT FOR VAN NUYS WALKING TOUR

Glass Box with Van Nuys High School Wolf Logo - gift to the Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gary Fredburg 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History.

Museum Board Member, and Chairman of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's emerging Tour Program, Richard Hilton is organizing our first walking tour of historic Van Nuys. Richard invites the community to send ideas about what should be included in a 2 1/2 hour exploration of downtown Van Nuys.

Email your ideas to gfecht@sbcglobal.net
or give your Museum a telephone call: 1 (818) 347-9665

Artifacts and art objects related to the history of Van Nuys are gratefully appreciated. You Museum is also seeking Van Nuys history volunteers who can work from their homes.

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SERVES THE CITY OF SAN FERNANDO

City of San Fernando c '60s - vintage postcard in the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - Gift of Gary Fredburg 2009 (click on image to enlarge)

A young man from Santa Barbara, who joined us this morning on The Museum's second walking tour of historic North Hollywood, remarked that those who live and work in big cities often become focused on their urban experiences, and unwittingly ignore the richness of smaller towns and cities.
One of the important communities often ignored in the hustle and bustle of Los Angeles life is the "founding city" of the Valley, the city of San Fernando.
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is dedicated to the collection, preservation and to sharing of artifacts and information about San Fernando and its residents with the entire Valley. We are actively searching for Board members from San Fernando.
Call your Museum to help us serve San Fernando. 1 (818) 3347-9665

CONTEMPORARY ART IN WOODLAND HILLS

Detail from Fence Panel by Frank Romero - 21st Century Sculpture Garden - Woodland Hills - 2009 (click on image to enlarge)
2009 - The Year of Valley History
The lines between contemporary culture and popular culture are often blurred. This annoys academics, but delights folks like me. This is compounded when whimsical and folk art works are added. The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is interested in all aspects of creativity expressed in the greater Valley and beyond.
If these areas interest you, contact your Museum soon. 1 (818) 347-9665.

The San Fernando Valley in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.