Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

www.TheMuseumSFV.org




Tuesday, September 30, 2008

VAN NUYS HIGH SCHOOL 50th REUNION PROGRAM 2008

Van Nuys High School - 50th Reunion Program - Class of 1958 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2008 - gift of Janne Shreves Fecht
Stimulated by the support of San Fernando Valley history by Ray Marin, alumnus of North Hollywood High School, more Valley high school stories are being collected every day by your Museum.
Is your school class having a reunion? Make sure that your Museum gets a copy of the program - and, contact us for supportive materials from our archives.
Go Wolves!

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

COMING OF AGE IN THE VALLEY IN THE 60s

Coming of age in the San Fernando Valley in the late 50s and early 60s was a time fun and innocence - the Viet Nam war was a distant thing.

Getting Ready for Branding Day - Pierce College c 1962 - photo courtesy of Bob Robar - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
The fellow in the hill-billy hat is none other than Dick Uschyk.

-Pierce College Football Game c, 1961 - photo courtesy of Bob Robar - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
The dark and handsome fellow with the serious look and the date is Scotty Motto.

- Valley College Sorority Women c. 1959 - photo courtesy of Bob Robar - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)

EARTHQUAKES AND THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

In case any of us forgot, it's not "if" the big Earthquake is coming to Los Angeles and our nervous Valley - it's "when!"
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley collects images and information concerning earthquakes in Southern California, and when we acquire exhibit space will regularly cover the issue.
In the meanwhile, your Museum supports John Bwarie's efforts to create great Earthquake Awareness and Preparation.

http://www.shakeout.org/


The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, September 29, 2008

SALUTE TO RAY MARIN

Ray Marin - North Hollywood High School Preservationist - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2008 (click on image to enlarge)
SALUTE TO RAY MARIN - THE MUSEUM'S MAN OF THE MONTH FOR OCTOBER 2008
Thanks to Ray Marin for his willingness to share his treasure trove of North Hollywood High School history, your Museum has a powerful insight into life at his alma mater in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Ray presented the Museum with a great compact disc featuring 8mm films made on the North Hollywood High School campus, along with music and photographs from the era. Your Museum has shared with alumnae women from Providence High School in Burbank, Valley advertisements from 1958 and other items to bring back memories for their 50th reunion.
Ray Marin understands the value of small items to help tell a bigger story. Below is an "Atomic Bomb" children's toy ring. It speaks more than words about the impact of "the bomb" on a far more naive world than our own. ... And, the bomb is made of lead no less.
Atomic Bomb Ring - Image in the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2008 -
THANKS RAY - WE APPRECIATE YOUR HELP!

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Saturday, September 27, 2008

1932 OLYMPIC GAMES MEDALLION BY HUGO BALLIN

Proposed Medallion for the 1932 Olympic Games - Collection of Phyllis Hansen - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2008 (click on image to enlarge)

Your Museum's electronic archives grow every day. Here, a newspaper clipping from an early Los Angeles newspaper (c. 1931) shows a medallion by the major California artist Hugo Ballin. The caption for the image reads: "Depicting Pallas Athena, diety of the Olympic Games, a seventeen foot medallion b Hugh Ballin A.N.A. will be hung at the entrance of the stadium."
It is assumed that the "stadium" would have been the Los Angeles Coliseum but it may have also been the swimming venue in Exposition Park.
Those who pay attention to the murals in public buildings in the Los Angeles area should be familiar with the splendid works of Hugo Ballin. His images grace the Griffith Park Observatory, the entrance of the historic Edison Building, the Burbank City Hall and the great Wilshire Temple ....and much more. Ballin came to Los Angeles in 1921 at the urging of Louie B. Mayer to work for MGM. He was trained as a classical painter, demonstrated in this medallion image.

For all of the beauty and sophistication of Bellin's works, there is a funny little mistake in this design. Lady Pallas Athena is the Goddess of the city of Athens (Athena). As such Her image would not have been utilized to represent the ancient Olympic Games that were dedicated to Lord Zeus. (The Gods got a bit jealous over these things.)

Just for ducks.... The artist who created the logo for the American Medical Association made a similar "classic" mistake, when he or she used the caduceus wand of Lord Mercury for the good doctors. Unfortunately Lord Aesculapius is the God of Medicine and his symbol is a forked stick with a snake entwined about it. The God Mercury or Hermes is the Deity of Commerce, Cattle Rustlers and Thieves. (Well, maybe the artist got the right image after all?)

The San Fernando Valley, in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World deserves a great Museum of history and culture.
Support The Museum of the San Fernando Valley,

Friday, September 26, 2008

THE VALUE OF A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - ORPHA KLINKER 1851

Chinese Woman - Newspaper image by Orpha Klinker - Herald Express 1951 - Gift of Phyllis Hansen 2008 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
On Saturday February 24, 1951, the people of Los Angeles who paid their 7¢ for a Herald Express newspaper, read an article entitled: "Etchers Honor L.A. Artist - Orpha Klinker Gets Top Award From Cal. Society." This week the original article was donated to her Museum by Phyllis Hansen.
What is the importance of an article describing an art show held in conjunction with "High Tea" at the Ambassador Hotel? Let's take a look.
The article featured two newspaper images that document the existence of two important art works by the great California Orpha Klinker.
1) A landscape of the High Sierra country.
2) Study of a Chinese Girl
The date of the works exhibition was May 1951 at the Dolphin Court of the Ambassador Hotel. Two honors received by Orpha Klinker from the California Society of Etchers for her work "Winter Snows."

Said the article's author Alma May Cook, "Orpha Klinker probably does more work and delivers more lectures than any other woman painter in Southern California."

High Sierras - Newspaper image by Orpha Klinker - Herald Express 1951 - Gift of Phyllis Hansen 2008 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)



Your Museum collects the works and information on California artists. Orpha Klinker is of special importance to our organization.

The San Fernando Valley, the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, deserves a great Museum of history and art.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

EDGAR BERGAN

Utah handbill - Edgar Bergen with Zeno Klinker - 1962 - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Phyllis Hansen 2008 (click on image to enlarge)
During the 1930s and 1940s, Edgar Bergen and his zany cast of puppet characters were among the most popular entertainers in America. Everyone knew the aristocratic Charle McCarthy and his country bumpkin pal Mortimer Snerd. A new generation of fans came along with the introduction of Effie Klinker, the man-hunting hill billy mountain aunt of Mortimer. The great Zeno Klinker named Effie for his own quaint relatives "back east."
Old time radio wouldn't have been the same without the writing of Zeno Klinker and the wonderful voices of the great Edgar Bergen. On one of those once in a blue moon occasions when you get to visit Washington DC, drop in and say hello to Charle who is part of the Smithsonian Museum's collection.

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley invites you to share your memories of early radio broadcasts with future generations. Contact your Museum today at (818) 347-9665 to contribute your artifacts and ideas.

Creating a great Museum of history and culture in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World.
THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

ZENO KLINKER EARLY CALIFORNIA AERO-CAMERAMAN


Zeno Klinker - Aerial Movie Cameraman - ARCS Christmas Program 1970 - Gift from Phyllis Hansen 2008 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. (click on image to enlarge)
Your Museum collects artifacts and information concerning all aspects of the Entertainment Industry. Emerging in the heart of the Creative Capital of the World, The Museum of the San Fernando Valley actively seeks information on stunt pilots and aerial camera persons.

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

TRADE WITH CHINA - LOS ANGELES / LONG BEACH SEAPORT

(Political Cartoon 1931 - Gift of Phyllis Hansen to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2007 (click on images to enlarge)
In 1931, there were many people who remembered all too well the Boxer Rebellion in China that seemed to have fizzled out only 30 years before. The struggle to close China off from foreign trade and abuses by the Chinese Society of Right and Harmonious Fists (The Boxers) had forced out of the Land of the Dragon foreign religious missionaries and western efforts to "modernize" Chinese society at the expense of its culture.
As the 1932 Olympics approached there was great excitement in Los Angeles and Long Beach about the development of the area's great seaport. The 1984 Olympics just happened to coincide with the announcement that the Los Angeles - Long Beach seaport was the largest seaport in America.
Look at these three political cartoons from the January - Midwinter special edition insert of the Los Angeles Times. (gift to the Museum by Phyllis Hansen). Consider America's trade deficit with China today and consider these cartoons' meanings today and 77 years ago.

Note the yellow border of the cartoons, and the stereotypical images of the Chinese and the Americans.

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley collects information and artifacts related to commercial issues, politics and race.

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

PHYLLIS HANSEN GIVES THE MUSEUM AN OLYMPIC GAMES TREASURE

Festival of Nations (detail) 1930 - Painting by A. L. Ewing - Los Angeles Times - Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Phyllis Hansen 2007 (click on image to enlarge)
This image graces the cover of a special insert section of the Los Angeles Times on January 2, 1931. It is reproduced from a painting done in 1930 by the illustrator A. L. Ewing. Athletes from around the world celebrate at the entrance of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
The romantic images of California done in the 1920s and 30s are among the world's great art treasures. This blog image has been slightly color enhanced to restore the newspaper's picture to its likely intensity 77 years ago. The interior of this special insert contains a wonderful painting/illustration by the great Orpha Klinker.

Your Museum collects information and artifacts related to the Los Angeles Olympic Games (1932 - 1984) and Olympic athletes from the greater San Fernando Valley. We also collection the works of the California artist Orpha Klinker, and other works related to the history of the American West. This gift from Phyllis Hansen supports both efforts.

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Monday, September 22, 2008

MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY'S BOARD MEETS THIS WEDNESDAY

Vicious Dogs - 2008 - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht (click on image to enlarge)
DON'T FORGET
Board of Directors and Advisors of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley meets this Wednesday from 5:30 PM until 7:30 PM
Lankershim Arts Center

Vicious Dogs
5231 Lankershim Blvd.
North Hollywood, CA 91601

A BRIEF HISTORY OF SPORTSMEN'S LODGE

Water Mill Decoration Over Original Artesian Wells - Sportsmen's Lodge 2005 - Photo in Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley -2008 - Photo and Article by Gerald Fecht (click on image to enlarge)

For people, newly arrived in the San Fernando Valley, it is hard to imagine that our semi-arid hillsides and chaparral-covered mountains were much admired by Spanish explorers and Mexican settlers. The reason was that, unlike the fearsome Mojave Desert to the northeast, the Valley had constant, albeit modest supplies of water. At the base of the hills that surround much of the Valley are natural springs, many of which are year-round sources of water. Great Pleistocene Era animals may once have stopped for water here.
Historic springs exist many places along Ventura Boulevard. This is why the Spaniards established California's first highway, El Camino Real, along this long used pathway.
One such artesian spring that fed the Los Angeles River was located on old Ventura Highway, near the entrances to Coldwater and Laurel Canyons. Travelers riding on saddle horses or in buckboard wagons might have stopped to water their animals here, but the Butterfield Stage probably passed it by on its way from Campo de Cahuenga to Casa de los Encinos.
When the Mission San Fernando Rey de España was deeded its land grant from the King of Spain, the land where Sportsmen's Lodge stands today was the property of the Catholic Church. With the Mexican Revolution, the land was secularized and re-deeded to Califorñio rancheros. The land was sold to the entrepreneurial Isaac Lankershim and his associates at the end of the 19th century.
In 1909 the Sportsmen's Lodge property changed hands once again, this time to the powerful newspaper mogul Harry Chandler. Harry knew well the value of water and transportation to the development of the San Fernando Valley. Two years later the "Red Car" trolleys entered through Cahuenga Pass and a century of phenomenal growth followed. Chandler would eventually sell his west Valley ranch house to Edgar Rice Burroughs of Tarzan fame, and the Lodge property made its way into the hands of the then famous actors Noah and Wallace Beery.
Today, with boulevards and freeways crossing the San Fernando Valley, it is hard to imagine a time when Ventura Boulevard was one of very few east-west passages in the area. Gradually, parts of Ventura Highway were paved as a two-way roadway, and horse ranches, orchards and farms took advantage of Mr. Mulholland's Owens River water supply. A small oasis of fix-it shops, cafes for snacks and new fangled gasoline stations sprouted where Coldwater Canyon crossed Ventura Boulevard. These small businesses grew by a series of small lakes and ponds that had been developed out of a small lake created in the 1880s near the edge of the Los Angeles River. The Berry brothers and their contemporaries stocked those lakes with trout. Wallace Berry fancied himself quite a fisherman and liked to pose with his catches. At this time the Lodge was called the Hollywood Trout Farms.
By the 1930s the trout ponds at what is now called Sportsmen's Lodge became a serious business. Fish were delivered alive throughout Southern California and even as far as Nevada. People brought their children to the site to catch their first fish and have them cooked-up in the growing restaurant. Because of its location, just west of the Max Sennett Studios (later Republic Studios) the area became the perfect place to stop on the way home, or to visit for a get-away lunch. The place was also on the road home for actors and other film workers who carved out small "rancheros" in the privacy of the west and north Valley. (Since this was during Prohibition, we'll assume that only soft drinks were available.)
One enterprising fellow, using natural spring water, created the San Fernando Valley's first golf course at the intersection of Coldwater Canyon and Ventura Boulevards in 1922.
At the conclusion of WWII, Sportsmen's Lodge was officially renamed. And, a legal bar was opened in the 1950s. The adjacent hotel was the perfect place for out of town actors and film workers to stay while working in the Valley. Reliance on the artesian spring disappeared and the water redirected underground to the Los Angeles River. Catching fish in a restaurant didn't fit into the plans of the city's Health Department. Although the maze-like corridors of Sportsmen's Lodge reveal an added on feeling, the trout are now imported and koi fish lazily swim about manicured ponds.
Old time San Fernando Valley residents still talk of running into Gene Autry or Roy Rogers at Sportsmen's Lodge. Actors like Rex Allen, Lash Larou, Gabby Hayes, and John Wayne were often spotted at the Lodge. Other performers who frequented the restaurant included Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, Bette Davis, and Katherine Hepburn. Bogart, Bacall and Spencer Tracy also were at Sportsmen's Lodge regularly for lunch.
During the 1960s there was a real scarcity of ballrooms whose capacities would hold 500 people. The Sportsmen's Lodge was the exception. Thus, for a generation of Valley residents, the Lodge became a part of their high school prom and wedding reception memories. The Lodge was enlarged to accommodate more guests. Decorate trees and plants matured, waterfalls and swans added, as well as tropical plants and flowers.
The halls of the Sportsmen's Lodge restaurant and hotel are filled with the stories of the famous, and those who were celebrities for a day. Among the many memories occurred in the 1968, when U.S. Senator Robert Kennedy stayed at the Lodge, with his entourage before his spectacular victory in California's Presidential Primary. Kennedy won the election but lost his life at the hands of an assassin.
In 2002, Paula Foster Chambers wrote:
" In the early 2000s, efforts were taken to secure protected historical status for the Sportsmen's Lodge. In 2002, the Studio City Residents Association, backed by the Los Angeles Conservancy, submitted an application to designate the Lodge's banquet center as a Historic-Cultural Monument."
The Cultural Heritage Commission approved the historic designation and sent it on to the Los Angeles City Council."
The effort to conserve the Sportsmen's Lodge as the Council rejected a Cultural Landmark, but the movement continues.
In 2007, Sportsmen's Lodge was sold to Los Angeles developer Richard Weintraub. While retaining the name of the facility, the area will be redeveloped to reflect the ambiance of the San Fernando Valley as it was in the 1950s.
`

Sunday, September 21, 2008

CONGRATULATIONS STUDIO CITY HISTORY COMMITTEE

Fra Junipero Serra Mosaic - 2006 - Studio City - Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht (click on image to enlarge)

CONGRATULATIONS
to the History Committee of the Studio City Neighborhood Association's History Committee on its outstanding tour or Studio City architecture today.
Getting people out to see and appreciate the San Fernando Valley's rich heritage is a treasure in itself! The Museum of the San Fernando Valley salutes the great job today.



The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and art.

Friday, September 19, 2008

AN OPEN LETTER ABOUT NEED FOR A MUSEUM FOR THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

The following is a reprint of a letter to the editor of the Daily News from Gerald Fecht, President of the Museum of the San Fernando Valley: August 28, 2008

The Museum Community of the San Fernando Valley lives on a psychological roller coaster; on one hand we experience the loss of historic treasures and on the other the thrill of preservation's success.

Just months ago our Valley lost to a midnight wrecking ball, the oldest home in Van Nuys. A massive development at this very time threatens to overwhelm the priceless historic dignity of Campo de Cahuenga - the very place where American became a nation from sea-to-shining-sea.

There are, on the other hand, thrilling victories for history's preservation today and future
generations as well. The grand old Weddington House, the mother-house of North Hollywood and Toluca Lake, has been rescued from a cross-town move out of the Valley to the Arroyo Seco. At this time, plans are being completed to move the Weddington to its new home at an unused corner of North Hollywood Park. Now, we have learned that the great old Phil's Diner will be preserved and revitalized as an integral part of the NoHo Commons dev. project.

Rescuing historic structures and artifacts is a great thing, but coming up with the money to pay for repairs and restoration is another - especially in today's economy. Casey Hollenbeck, the owner of Phil's Diner is quoted in the Daily News as having to come up with $1.5 million to launch the beloved old dining car.

Those of us working to bring about The Museum of the San Fernando Valley are often told, "this just isn't the time to create a museum." Is this the best time to save Phil's Diner? You bet it is! As historians, we like to remind folks that the United States of America was created in the bleak winter of Valley Forge, when the Continental Congress was flat bloke. Alaska was purchased in the middle of the Civil War and many of the greatest social achievements in our country's history came about the end of the great depression.

When is the best time to preserve the heritage of the San Fernando Valley? You guessed it; right now.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

CALL (818) 509-0230 FOR STUDIO CITY TOUR

Studio City Street Decoration 2008 - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. Photo by Gerald Fecht - (click on image to enlarge)

It's not too late to be part of the once-in-a-lifetime self guided tour of Studio City this Sunday. Call (818) 509-0230.

ONCE IN A LIFETIME TOUR OF STUDIO CITY

(click on image to enlarge)

Sunday, September 14, 2008

THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY WANTS YOUR OPINION ABOUT ART AND CREATIVITY.

Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Gerald Fecht 2008 - (click on image to enlarge)

The need of human beings to create is a marvelous and important thing. Here a broken window in Wilmington on September 13th 2008 is protected by a sheet of cardboard, or is it protected by a work of art? What would Andy have said? Is it an artistic statement if done before being used to protect the store until the window person arrives? If it was drawn "after" the cardboard was used, is it then vandalism. What is the nature of art? Can cardboard be used to create "fine art"?
Should Derek have included his last name?

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Photo for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2008 by Gerald Fecht (click on image to enlarge) The Disco Ball Pinto

Your Museum collects images and artifacts related to Pop Culture.



The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

VALLEY VETERAN JAMES FECHT DONATED MONEY FROM IWO JIM TO YOUR MUSEUM

Currency from WWII - Gift from James L. Fecht to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2007 (click on image to enlarge)
Two (likely) Japanese bills given to your Museum from James Fecht just before his death. Jim acquired these bills on Iwo Jima.

IWO JIMA STORY AND PHILIPPINE MONEY IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Philippine 10 centavo note: Gift to The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by James L. Fecht in 2007
James Fecht, a young American Marine in World War II brought back several interesting artifacts, one of which is this small 10 centavo note from pre-World War II Philippines. The bill was found on a Japanese soldier captured during the invasion of the Island of Iwo Jima. Japanese prisoners, and there were very few on Iwo Jima, were stripped and made to lay under barbed wire. Artifacts in their clothing not deemed of military significance were divided among the young Americans guarding the prisoners.
Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click to enlarge)

After WWII, James Fecht married and settled in the San Fernando Valley. It was years before he talked about his experiences in the war, among which was the guarding of prisoners on Iwo Jima. He talked about how much he hated the prisoners, and how he feared them. Jim had seen the results of the Japanese army's atrocities on other islands and the deaths of his friends and fellow Marines. His indoctrination about the "sub-human" status of the Japanese made him more fearful, dangerous and determined.

SMALL THINGS BECOME PART OF THE BIGGER PICTURE.

Historic Mission San Gabriel - founded 1771 - Postcard Collection of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - Gift of LeRoy Hunt - 2008 (click on image to enlarge)

Museum artifacts and even minor things like post cards and school year books a vital components to the "Big Picture" of events and circumstances of other times and places. The Mission San Gabriel, while not in the San Fernando Valley, was the sister compound of the Mission San Fernando Rey. The location of the Valley's Spanish mission was due, in large measure, to its traveling distance by foot/horseback to San Gabriel. This true also to the location of the Pueblo of Los Angeles. Thus the story of San Gabriel Mission is of significance to Valley history.
Thanks to LeRoy Hunt for the little but important gift to his and your Museum.


The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Thursday, September 11, 2008

M&FM VALLEY FIRM LICENSED LA's BICENTENNIAL

Logo for the 200th Anniversary of the Founding of Los Angeles 1981. Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)
Your Museum collects historical objects and information about all of the communities that make up greater Los Angeles. We have a significant collection of artifacts related to the bicentennial of the founding of Los Angeles. The San Fernando Valley based company Marketing and Financial Management Enterprises (M&FM) was chosen by the City of Los Angeles to license the event.
M&FM was founded by Chester Swenson, Stephen Falk and David Strole, all of whom were graduates of Los Angeles Valley College.


The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

GRADY ELLIS TALBOT - FOUNDER OF YOUR MUSEUM

Museum Founder Grady E. Talbot JD - Photo scanned by LeRoy Hunt for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - 2008 (Click on image to enlarge)
It was 46 years ago when Captain Grady E. Talbot began flying in Viet Nam for the United States Air Force. He served three tours of duty there as a fighter pilot from 1962 to 1969. He flew F-100's. Captain Talbot flew on the first strike into North Vietnam in the Spring of 1965.
Prior to entering the Air Force he had served as a United States Marine in the Korean Conflict. On his return from Korea as a Marine, Grady Talbot enrolled in Los Angeles Pierce Community College. There, with students from both Pierce and Los Angeles Valley College, he organized the Phi Delta Psi Fraternity on October 13th, 1956. He served as the second president of that organization. After his graduation from Pierce College in 1958, he completed his undergraduate studies in mechanical engineering at California Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo in 1961.
On his return to the United States Grady worked as a stockbroker in Phoenix, Arizona from 1970 to 1973. From that year until 1986, Grady farmed in the Imperial Valley, near El Centro, California. In 1990, he completed his Doctorate of Law degree from the University of San Diego's School of Law. He was an active member of California State Bar until his recent retirement..
Grady was elected the first President of the reorganized Maple Leaf Society in the spring of 2004. The Maple Leaf Society is an alumni organization of the Phi Delta Psi that raises funds for community college scholarships.
He is a founder and member of the Board of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley.
He and his wife Alice live in Arcadia, California.
He was born on the 30th of November in Los Angeles, California

Tuesday, September 9, 2008

ROBERT MARKO PHI DELTA PSI FRATERNTIY

Commemoration Card 1990 for Robert Marko - Gift to the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley by Jerry Berns September 2008 (click on image to enlarge) The small enameled pin at the top right is a Maple Leaf Pledge Pin.

Robert Marko was a major student leader in the San Fernando Valley in the 1960s. He was the President of the Phi Delta Psi Fraternity's Beta Chapter at Los Angeles Pierce College. He died on the 15th of January, 1990.

CAMPO DE CAHUENGA - A RESPONSIBILITY TO AMERICA

Board of Campo de Cahuenga meets at Andres Pico Abobe - Sept. 2008 - Photo by Phyllis Hansen for the Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. (click on image to enlarge)

Preserving local history carries with it a "sense of place" for today and future generations. The Museum of the San Fernando Valley takes pride in our role to protect, preserve and present our Valley's heritage. But, there are sites in California that have a greater role than the maintenance of regional culture. Campo de Cahuenga is such a place.
The Campo is the very place where the historic dream of Manifest Destiny was fulfilled, and all of us have a responsibility to our nation to safeguard this treasure. Standing by Campo de Cahuenga is a duty to our country.
The Museum Community of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley calls on all elements of our community to honor this American treasure!
Go to the Campo de Cahuenga link on this blog. Read about the Campo and become a member today.

JEFF PIRTLE VISITS HISTORIC LANKERSHIM READING ROOM

Jeff Pirtle 2008 - Photo by Gerald Fecht for Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley - (click on image to enlarge)

The great Valley historian Jim Gulbranson had a eye for the preservation of San Fernando Valley history. That's one good reason the historic Lankershim Reading Room was saved just days before the wrecking ball crushed its value for future generations. The reading room is now under restoration by the San Fernando Valley Historical Society at the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills.

While Campo de Cahuenga is under renovation, Phyllis Hansen (who is a member of the Historical Society) and a Board Member of both Campo de Cahuenga and The Museum of the San Fernando Valley) saw the opportunity for the Campo and Historical Society to hold their meetings at the same time and to share a pot luck dinner - to get to know each other better.

Before their respective meetings, Jeff Pirtle (Archivist for NBC Universal and Board Member of Campo de Cahuenga) got to visit the Andres Pico Adobe, the Lankershim Reading Room and Archives of the Historical Society, for the first time. He and other Campo Board members now have a far greater awareness of the activities and challenges of the Historical Society.

Deuk Perrin, President of Campo de Caheunga, called for regular exchanges between groups working to preserved Valley and California history. Your Museum is working hard to bring about services for storage and artifact preservation of Valley historical treasures.

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

HONORING MIDGE GISEL

Midge Giesel 2008 - Photo by Gerald Fecht - Archives of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley (click on image to enlarge)

The Museum Community of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley joins with the San Fernando Valley Historical Society in honoring the years of unselfish service to Valley history by Midge Giesel. Should future generations ever stop to wonder how their history got preserved, they might do well to remember Midge Giesel.

Friday, September 5, 2008

CALIFORNIA AIR GUARD BUILDINGS ON ROSCOE BOULEVARD

For sometime the buildings of the old California Air Guard base at Van Nuys Air Port have been unused and appearing to be falling apart. Windows are broken and the structures were unpainted. Now, there is a fence around the place with barrier that blocks seeing what's going on. A piece of Valley (California) history seems on its way out.

(click on images to enlarge)



Tuesday, September 2, 2008

PROVIDENCE ALUMNAE OF 1959 SET UP TERRIFIC BLOG

1957 North Hollywood High School advertisement - Courtesy of Ray Marin (click on image to enlarge)

In preparation for the upcoming 50th class reunion of Providence High School Burbank, the "Pioneers" (they were the first class in the school's history) are building a blog. The Museum Community of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is proud to share the history of our big Valley with such an accomplished group of women. If you have photos, scrapbooks etc. of Providence High or the late 1950s, let us know and we'll share them with Providence Alumnae.
Wasn't "Bal" the place to go for Easter Vacation?

Providence High's Class of 1959 blog is:
http://phs-59.blogspot.com/

Notre Dame High's Call of 1957 blog is:
http://ndhs1957.blogspot.com/

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley's blog is:
http://museumsanfernandovalley.blogspot.com/

Monday, September 1, 2008

STUDIO CITY TOUR - SEPTEMBER 21, 2008

The once a year home and history self guided tour of Studio City will take place on September 21. Tickets are very scarce, so contact the Studio City History Project right away. (818) 509-0230 (10AM until 4PM)
Republic Studios -- Studio City California -Gift of Gary Fredburg to the vintage postcard collection of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2008 (click on image to enlarge

Carlton Motor Lodge 11811 Ventura Boulevard - Studio City California -Gift of Gary Fredburg to the vintage postcard collection of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley 2008 (click on image to enlarge)

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

CALIFORNIA'S NATURAL TREASURES

Mary Olson-Friedman is an explorer. She and a small group of like-minded friends regularly explore the many natural and human-made treasures of Southern California. Fortunately, this Woodland Hills resident, takes along her camera. Here Mary takes a close up look at a California liveoak and other marvels in the Santa Barbara Botanical Gardens
(click on images to enlarge)
There are over 1000 species of lichens in California. These wonderful plants are part alga and part fungus.

The native mosses and lichens in better watered canyons of Southern California provided our Native Peoples with splendid dyes for clothing, basket designs and colors for paints.

Bark of a California live oak. (click to enlarge)
Mary warns us that before one looks for lichens from which to make natural dyes, it's a good idea to know what poison oak looks like.

The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

MYSTERY POSTCARD OF 1918 GETS MORE CLEAR

Historic postcard - Gift to your Museum by Gary Fredburg 2008 (click on imgage to enlarge) Entrance to San Fernando Tunnel. San Joaquin Valley Line - Southern Pacific Railroad Company.
This message is on the back of the postcard (with train emerging) seen on previous posting. The following was my first attempt to read a blurred notation made in area just above the two 1¢ stamps.

This, I believe, is the signature of the aviator attached to the 158th Aero Suadron, on his way to France. The signature was enlarged and areas around it cleaned to reveal the signature.


Your Museum collects the stories of soldiers and veterans.
The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.