Tel: (818) 347-9665 PST

info@TheMuseumSFV.org

www.TheMuseumSFV.org




Thursday, June 28, 2007

INTEGRITY OF CAMPO DE CAHEUNGA THREATENED - SO. CALIFORNIA'S MOST IMPORTANT HISTORIC SITE THREATENED.



American Historic Treasure Turned into a Mall Attraction

The following is a News Release from the Campo de Cahuenga Historical Memorial Association, the all-volunteer organization created by the Californians who saved the Campo site in the mid 20th century. What have long been suspected, the integrity of Southern California's MOST IMPORTANT HISTORIC SITE is at stake.
Can you imagine allowing fast food taco stands to be erected at the edge of the Alamo? Is the place where California became part of the United States being relegated to a mall attraction? Read this now. Consider the consequences and contact the Campo with your support.


NEWS RELEASE June 26, 2007

On June 25, 2007, a number of us from the Campo de Cahuenga Historical Memorial Association attended the Universal/Metro (Thomas Properties Group) Scoping Meeting at Van Nuys City Hall. The Project surrounds the Campo de Cahuenga Historical Site.

The proposed development located at the Universal Metro Rail Station will include a 315,000 sq.ft., 5 story Media Center with 4 levels of underground parking; a 24 story, 655,200 sq.ft. Office Tower; 25,000 sq.ft. of retail; and a 245,000 sq.ft. garage, 7 levels above ground and 3 levels below ground all in Phase 1. Phase 2 includes a planned 472,500 sq. ft. Office Building or a 897,600 sq ft., 400 Condos/300 Hotel Rooms Building directly across Lankershim Boulevard from the existing #10 Universal City Plaza and additional Parking Podium of 6 levels of parking above ground and 2 levels of parking below ground.

This Scoping Meeting was conducted by the City’s Planning Department to solicit comments on additional issues that should be studied and analyzed in the forthcoming Environment Impact Report (EIR). We were dismayed at the graphics that were displayed by the TPG team. In their attempt to depict the Campo de Cahuenga as a feature in an outdoor office mall, they showed the alteration and removal of “non-historic features” including the concrete block walls at the northern and western edges of the Campo de Cahuenga property and replanting numerous trees and bushes on the property. They referred to the existing adobe as a visitor center, not a museum of historical importance to the United States of America and California

They ignored the protective designation by the National Register of Historic Places granted to the Campo de Cahuenga.

To make matters worse, other graphics showed blinking supergraphics and other large scale animated signs designated for advertising oriented on nearby skyscrapers pointing at the Campo. It reminded those of us that saw the graphics of the worst of the Las Vegas strip at night.

As indicated by TPG’s own commissioned researched documents (dated December 14, 2006) the National Register designation includes “boundaries of Los Angeles City Park, including the existing buildings, landscape, and intact remains of the adobe foundation and floors”. Included are the surrounding concrete wall around the edge of the property and the large iron gated entrance. There is NO distinction of “Historic or Non-Historic features”. In fact, the first formal design for the grounds was prepared in 1927, revised in 1949 by the City’s Recreation and Parks Department. It retained the perimeter walls, central water feature, trees, and axial paths dividing areas of lawn. The drawing specified the number and location of plants appropriate to the mission.

What was shown at the Scoping Meeting was not covered in the Initial Study and will destroy the Campo Site. No longer will our association be able to plan fundraisers and other special events. Protection of the site will be impossible. The ambience and serenity as we know it today will be gone forever.

All of us who respect and protect our historic beginnings must SAVE THE CAMPO FOR THE FUTURE GENERATIONS.

Tuesday, June 26, 2007

DEMOLITION OF HISTORIC SYLVAN STREET HOUSE, BRINGS A CALL FOR EMERGENCY PRESERVATION HOTLINE








Latino
Heritage
Street Mural
Canoa Park












The loss of the historic Sylvan Street house in Van Nuys this week demonstrates how important communication is within the Museum Community of the San Fernando Valley (indeed, all of Southern California.)
Your Museum is working hard to establish strong communication links within our city's groups that share interests in history and culture, but in-the-meanwhile, we stand to lose treasure after treasure to the wrecking ball or to neglect.
Institutions established to protect the interests of the public are not always prepared to act; especially is needed action is immediate.
Until such time as our Museum Community has the money, power and influence to respond to immediate threats facing our heritage (and, the heritage of our children,) we can at least be made aware of the immediate dangers our history faces.
Your Museum will consider this issue at its June Board meeting.

Monday, June 25, 2007

WORLD WAR II MILITARY SOUVENIER COLLECTIONS GROWS









Girls on the
Home Front

Japanese
Artifact
Postcard
Found on
Iowa Jima

Valley
Veterans
Collection


It is amazing how the categories of what soldiers value are alike. Warriors keep images of their gods, saints, girlfriends (and today, boyfriends), letters from home, writing paper, post cards and belt buckles, dog tags and even tooth brushes. Dehumanized enemies end up being so much alike.

TAKE TIME FOR THE GIRL SCOUTS OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY






Historic Book Plate
featuring
Girl Scouts of
America
c. 1935













This last Saturday, a good friend and Girl Scout leader, Sandi Fastnow, led us on a tour of a Southern California treasure, the Old Mill in San Marino. She explained that she often comes to the Mill with her Girl Scout group. Sandi knew all the secrets about the Mill and its lush gardens. And, since The Museum of the San Fernando Valley had just acquired this vintage book plate (c. 1935) , and a tin Johnson and Johnson Girl Scout First Aid Kit from the late 1940s, I thought the image on our Museum blog might be a nice way of saying thanks to Sandi -and, to all those great people working through the Girl Scouts of America to make our country a better place to live.

Did you know that the San Fernando Valley has its very own Girl Scout Historical Society?
The Girl Scouts Historical Society meets the third Wednesday of the month, from 9am to 1pm at the council service center, 9421 Winnetka Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.
The Society collects and cares for a collection of vintage Girl Scout uniforms, books, and memorabilia. These items are used to promote the history of Girl Scouting in programs for troops, displays, fashion shows and other presentations for Girl Scouts, leaders, and the community as a whole.

The area served by Girl Scouts of the San Fernando Valley encompasses a 260 square mile area, bounded by Los Angeles City line to the north, Mulholland Drive to the south, Burbank-Glendale to the east and the Ventura County line to the west.

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."

A TRIBUTE TO ARTIST CELIA HICKLIN
























California Artist Celia Hicklin shows off her puppet sculpture
at the Acorn Gallery in Highland Park

Don't forget to bookmark this blog's address, so that you can visit your Museum often. Also you may make and post comments, or send things to me to post on the Journal site (the blog.)

THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY MEETS THIS WEDNESDAY









Parking Lot Mural
Canoga Park
Remmet Street

Another reminder of our June Board Meeting of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, this Wednesday.





Board members, Advisors and Community members are welcomed.
The meeting will be held on the last Wednesday -

June 27 at 5:30 pm until 7:00 pm
at the:
Canoga Park Youth Arts Center
7222 Remmet Avenue
Canoga Park CA 91303

101 Freeway to Topanga Canyon
proceed north to Sherman Way.
Turn right (east) onto Sherman Way
proceed to Remmet Avenue
turn right and you are there.

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."

Sunday, June 24, 2007

THE IMPORTANCE OF COSTUMES TO THE MUSEUM OF THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY
























The Archangel Gabriel - bronze bas relief from the main door of
Saint Cyril Catholic Church - Sherman Oaks, California

Costumes and costume design are a special interest for The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, from several perspectives. First, we are interested in what human beings have worn throughout the history of the San Fernando Valley and Southern California (from the Tonva to space exploration). Next, the role of costumes and costume design in the entertainment industry's history is of great importance to us, as related to productions related to the Valley and Los Angeles. 
Finally, the history of textiles, fabrics etc. are a major interest to our Museum Community.
costuming is a huge undertaking for us, since we are attracted to all aspects from sacred vestments to zoot suits, from the poodle skirts of the '50s to Nudie's rhinestone cowboy shirts. 
 Designer, costumer and educator, Shon LeBlanc is The Museum's advisor on matters of costume and textiles. He is a member of The Museum's Performing Arts Committee, chaired by San Fernando Valley playwright, Willard Simms.

Saturday, June 23, 2007

RICHARD HILTON LEADS L.A. CONSERVANCY TOUR OF HIGHLAND PARK



Richard Hilton leads tour of the Sycamore Grove area of Highland Park for the L.A. Conservancy.

Richard Hilton works tirelessly to preserve the architectural treasures of Los Angeles, especially in the San Fernando Valley. Here, on June 23, 2007, he leads a tour of the historic homes of Highland Park in the Arroyo Seco. An actor and community preservationist, Richard Hilton understands that knowledge and action are two critical elements in the effort to save our city's historic treasures today and for future generations.

We are proud to call him a member of our Museum Community.

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."

Thursday, June 21, 2007

MUSUEM BOARD MEETING JUNE 27TH IN CANOGA PARK











Palm Forest for sale
Canoga Park nursery
Topanga Canyon










Hi,
It's time to remind you of the June meeting of your Museum Board.
Board members, Advisors and Community members are welcomed.
The meeting will be held on the last Wednesday -
June 27 at 5:30 pm until 7:00 pm
at the:
Canoga Park Youth Arts Center
7222 Remmet Avenue
Canoga Park CA 91303

101 Freeway to Topanga Canyon
proceed north to Sherman Way.
Turn right (east) onto Sherman Way
proceed to Remmet Avenue
turn right and you are there.


The Center in an historic building that once served as the first
operator assisted phone company in the San Fernando Valley. The exterior
of the 1928 mission style building has been preserved while the interior
has been converted to a contemporary youth art center.

Wednesday, June 20, 2007

A BIG IDEA FROM VALLEY RESIDENT BETH KEACH!























California Phainopepla - Out of the Mountains Looking for Valley Water.

Beth Keach, co-manager of Wild Birds Unlimited in Woodland Hills, made a very important recommendation to her Museum today. "Why doesn't the Museum consider a natural history component?"
Beth's idea is so important that it will be added to the "Vision" discussion now underway in the committees of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. Just as we have learned the critical importance of water to our history and culture, the natural history of our area is intregal to our modern lives and history.
Thanks Beth for the great suggestion! What are your thoughts on this?
Jerry Fecht

Tuesday, June 19, 2007

THE GAMBLE-ESTUDILLO HOLMES HISTORIC HOME IN RIVERSIDE, CALFORNIA





The Gamble-Estudillo Homes dwelling in Riverside was built in 1911. This stately California bungalow home has been the residence of Ms. Patricia and Judge Dallas Holmes since 1971. The Holmes are supporters of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley.
"Situated on a large, triangular lot and framed by lovely old trees, this house is a true California bungalow. With its broad, horizontal lines, its wide, stone-pillared porches, and its casement windows, the Gamble-Estudillo house reflects the style of architects Maybeck and Green brothers." (Klotz - Hall).
In 1918 this magnificent home was sold Miguel Estudillo, an attorney and member of the California State Legislature. "Estudillo was an important attorney form an early California family. His great grandfather Jose Marie Estudillo came to San Diego in 1769, soon after the San Diego de Alcala Mission was founded. His mother was Adelaide, daughter of Don Louis Rubidoux, whose ranch in Jurupa was established in 1844.
The honorable Dallas Holmes is a judge of the Superior Court for Riverside County.

Sunday, June 17, 2007

LEND YOUR EXPERTISE TO THE MUSEUM COMMUNITY








"Toothpicks"

The Palms of
West Los Angeles

Photo by
Phyllis Hansen








This last Sunday I attended a "tapas" party in Woodland Hills to celebrate my friend Cynthia Ingham's birthday. While we feasted on terrific Spanish hors d' oeuvres, someone made notice that the Pepper Trees that once graced that community are all but gone.

Coincidentally that same day, Phyllis Hansen, a member of our Museum Community, sent this image of the wonderful palm trees that are as much a part of Los Angeles as the Hollywood sign.

Unfortunately the great palms of our city are in danger! And, the pepper trees of Woodland Hills are vanishing before our eyes. Global warming? Pesticides? Insects? What's going on?

The trees of the San Fernando Valley and the City of Los Angeles, of which we are a part, are part of our lives and our history.
If you are a tree hugger, or just an admirer, The Museum of the San Fernando Valley welcomes you.
Scan your modern or historical tree images and send them to jerry@anchoreducation.com

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."
Leave your comments below and make sure to post them.

Friday, June 15, 2007

PHOTOS OF SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AND L.A. WANTED








Lankershim Avenue

The Museum of the San Ferndando Valley collects photographs of the people and places of the San Fernando Valley and greater Los Angeles. Consider sharing the history of your school days, sports, family outings or neighborhoods with future generations.
Let us know what items you have available. We'll respond right away, if the photographs should be included in our Valley's history.
Historic photographs and artifacts for other parts of America are important to us too.
You can contact us by simply leaving a message below in the "comments". Don't forget to scroll down to "post" to secure your message on the blog. Or, contact the museum via our email: jerry@anchoreducation.com

Wednesday, June 13, 2007

IMPORTANT CLUE TO WEDDINGTON HOUSE MYSTERY







Is this wooden crate a clue to the origins of the Weddington House?

On Tuesday June 12th, the Cultural Heritage Commission of the City of Los Angeles took another, very positive; step in the protection of the Mother House of North Hollywood, the historic Weddington House. The endangered dwelling, at its present site on 11025 Weddington Street, North Hollywood, was the residence of the Weddington family at least from 1904. The purpose of the hearing was to determine if the building (not the grounds) deserved the status of an historic monument of the city.

An original house of Sheriff Wilson Weddington was shipped by rail from Storm Lake, Iowa to the village of Toluca (now North Hollywood) around 1888. Whether parts of the existing structure contain elements of that Iowa building is as yet unknown. However, just this last week, remnants of original wooden shipping crates were found in the attic of the present house.

Speaking on behalf of the Museum Community, I urged that the Commission give historic monument status to the Weddington House. Few structures from the Valley's agricultural past remain. And, the Weddington House, especially if it becomes part of the Lankershim Train Station Park, will be a vital link for families and children to our heritage.
Jerry Fecht

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."

GIRAFFE CAPTURED IN TARZANA!






Giraffe Arrival in Tarzana

Nothing beats the arrival of a new giraffe to make the day of children and Helen Baker, the founder of the Tarzana Community Center. Thanks to the generosity of an alert community member this fine topiary now overlooks Ventura Boulevard and the L.A. City Station across the street.

IT'S ALL DONE WITH MIRRORS







It's All Done With Mirrors
Photo Contributed by Phyllis Hansen
Museum Community member

Nobody seems to know for sure when the first Jacaranda trees were brought to the San Fernando Valley. They could have easily arrived with the early Spanish and Mexican colonists. The Franciscan monks who built the missions of California were especially fond of flowering trees, so they may have brought Jacaranda seeds from Mexico. Be that as it may, this terrific photograph taken this week by Phyllis Hansen reminds us all why the lush blossoms of the Jacaranda are so much loved in our community (unless you are the one who has to sweep up after them.)
Phyllis took this picture in Studio City. The mirrors are on the facade of the City National Bank Building near Laurel Canyon on Ventura Boulevard.
¡Ole' Phyllis!

Monday, June 11, 2007

A PROFOUND STATEMENT ABOUT HISTORY BY RICHARD HILTON

Dear Friends,
This last week several of us from the San Fernando Valley went before the California Redevelopment Association on behalf of the historic Lankershim Station in North Hollywood.
Richard Hilton's comments to the CRA Board, about the importance of history were so important, that I have asked his permission to share them with the entire Museum Community of the San Fernando Valley.
Gerald Fecht President The Museum of the San Fernando Valley

"Good Morning:

My name is Richard Hilton. I am a member of the Save the Depot Committee. I am also a docent at the Heritage Square Museum and have served as the Volunteer Representative on its Board of Directors. I am a docent at the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, as well as conducting four neighborhood tours for the LA Conservancy at Highland Park, City of San Pedro, Angelino Heights and the USC Campus. I am currently creating an historical walking tour of the Van Nuys Civic Center and business core.

I and thousands of petition signers view the Depot not only as a major icon for the important history of North Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley as a whole, but as an irretrievable building block for quality of life issues, both present and future.

In its heyday it was the Gateway to the Valley, and remains appropriately positioned to continue to be that in the context of existing transportation projects. It was a catalyst for original growth and development of North Hollywood, and therefore, can be a key asset for future development. As HUD Secretary Mel Martinez said: "Preserving and rehabilitating architectural treasures often underpins more widespread community renewal programs, and provides future generations with a greater sense of appreciation for their community."

History reflects change and continuity in traditional cultural values. It plays a key role in providing an understanding of identity and a sense of belonging to a place or community that new architecture cannot. History is a part of our culture – like a painting or the theatre. Maintaining culture and sophistication is the sign of a conscious society. It is part of our value system, so that the physical presence of any piece of history makes it more real.

The Depot is surrounded by street names like Weddington, Bakman, Toluca, Bonner, Klump, and Hartsook, all honoring the area’s familial origins, and the depot with its interpretative potential can bridge that past to the present and future.

To see the Depot as it was will peak people’s interests, but to walk inside and see the bead board wainscoting and bare lighting, the potbelly stove and wavy glass, to stand where Valley pioneers stood actually transforms their experience to the visceral.

Without our memory, we cannot go forward. History allows us to reflect on what we did right and what we did wrong. The relevance of historical perspective cannot be underplayed and architectural reminders such as this are essential to a community’s core.

I applaud your efforts in allowing all of us to see history up close. Not just to look at a photo and get nostalgic, but to touch it and to let it touch us, and therefore, teach us.

Thank you."

Saturday, June 9, 2007

THE WEDDING MOTHER HOUSE OF NORTH HOLLYWOOD IN DANGER











The Weddington Family - photo taken in Storm Lake, Iowa
(left) Mary Weddington, Guy Weddington , Wilson Weddington and son Fred Weddington .

No family in San Fernando Valley history had a greater impact on our community's early history than that of Wilson Weddington. The photograph of the family was taken c. 1889 in Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, Iowa, just prior to the family's move to Lankershim Ranch.

Friday, June 8, 2007

DIANE COCKERILL "CURBITURE" IN TARZANA'S FAMOUS ORLANDO GALLERY
























Orlando Gallery is one of the oldest and most successful art galleries in greater Los Angeles. If you are into African art, it's one of the most important galleries in the nation.

From June 9th to the 30th, Orland Gallery will be featuring the exciting digital collage works of Diane Cockerill. Focusing on the unique patterns and colors found on LA sidewalks and curbs, Cockerill's art comes about from something all of us in the San Fernando Valley are all too familiar with - roadways and curbs!

Go see what an artist sees in the roadside words, colors and even the pavement cracks that create the visual impact of our urban and suburban life.

Reception June 9th from 6pm to 9pm

Orlando Gallery
18376 Ventura Boulevard
Tarzana
(818) 705-5386
Empken.com/orlando.htm.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

THE LOSS OF JIM GULBRANSON














Tulip Tree








It is with profound regret that The Museum of the San Fernando Valley acknowledges the passing of a great California historian and collector, Jim Gulbranson. Few have exceeded Jim's effort to carefully preserve our collective cultural heritage.

In his last days, this fine man was still at work to insure that the Valley's historic Campo de Cahuenga be fully utilized for future generations of Americans. The renovation now going on at the Campo in large measure reflects Jim's insistence on the highest museum standards for display and storage for research. He was a founding member of Campo de Cahuenga's Acquisions Committee.

When we first told Jim Gulbranson about our efforts to bring about a great Museum of history and culture for the San Fernando Valley, he warned us that it would take great effort, but in his words, "effort is the price you pay for building something that endures."

Jim Gulbranson passed away on June 6, 2007, after a long and difficult battle with cancer. A service to celebrate Jim's life will be held at the Simi Valley Covenant Church at 1 pm on Saturday June 9th. A reception will follow. The church is located at 4680 Alamo St., between the Stearns and Tapo Canyon off-ramps of the Ronald Reagan (118) Freeway in Simi Valley.

Thank you Jim Gulbranson for your life and leadership.

Tuesday, June 5, 2007

LEARN ABOUT THE STUDIO CITY HISTORY PROJECT & RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION
























Nuestra SeƱora de Guadalupe - Our Lady of Guadalupe
Tile wall shrine in Studio City, Calfornia

Among the many signs of the growing interest in the history and cultural heritage of the San Fernando Valley is the Studio City History Project.

According to its own description," The Studio City History Project is dedicated to collecting and preserving artifacts and memorabilia from the history of Studio City. Our goal is to document the history and share it with the public for current and future generations. If you are interested in participating, please contact the SCRA. We welcome all kinds of contributions – your time, your thoughts and your memories."

Check out the Studio City History Projects photo gallery at:
www.studiocityresidents.org/photo_album.php

Learn more about the Studio City Residents Association and the Studio City History Project by visiting:
http://www.studiocityresidents.org/history.php


"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."

SPECIAL THANKS TO A TERRIFIC ORGANIZATION - L.A. SHARES



United States Marines in the South Pacific - World War II
far right: Private James L. Fecht - San Fernando Valley Veteran

One of the best ideas and most creative organizations in our city is L.A. Shares. This non-profit program is a perfect example of a win-win-win concept. Instead of paying to discard out-of-date items or things no longer needed, businesses are able to donate reusable goods or materials to dozens of Los Angeles community groups in one stop.

New or used items are re-distributed, without charge to non-profit schools or agencies throughout Los Angeles.

The Museum of the San Fernando Valley uses L.A. Shares surplus "sheet protectors", file folders, envelopes and plastic storage pouches (from Avery Corporation), to safeguard photographs, news clippings, letters and other priceless artifacts.

Learn more about L.A. Shares by visiting its website at:
http://www.lashares.org/

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture."
jjj

Monday, June 4, 2007

A TERRIFIC WHITE ELEPHANT SALE THIS WEEKEND IN TARZANA












BOOKS
CERAMICS
GLASS
and..........
Other Great Stuff






What better place to look for a "white elephant" than the Tarzana Community Center's amazing safari of lost treasures sale on June 9, 2007. Like all great collectables sales, the White Elephant sale will get going early - really early: 8 am.
Don't worry that getting out for terrific bargains will cause you to miss your weekend breakfast. The Center's famous pancake breakfast will be going on at the same time.
Saturday June 9 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM


It's not too late to make contributions to the White Elephant Sale. Call: (818) 705-1286 for information.


The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of History and Culture.

CRISIS FACES HISTORIC WEDDINGTON HOUSE - THE MOTHER HOUSE OF NORTH HOLLYWOOD






One of the most important homes in the San Fernando Valley is facing the wrecking ball - as soon as this month!
In 1904, the Mother-House of North Hollywood was moved to its present site, now in the middle of an industrial neighborhood. Located at 11025 Weddington Street in North Hollywood, just west of Vineland, the venerable house was the home to generations of the family that founded the town of North Hollywood.
The Mother House of North Hollywood is just too important to future generations to be discarded.

We'll let you know more very soon about this sad situation. In the meanwhile contact The Museum of the San Fernando Valley and share you ideas, possible solutions, or feelings about this vital matter.



The San Fernando Valley deserves a great Museum of history and culture.

RARE PHOTOS OF PRESIDENT WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT FOUND IN NORTH HOLLYWOOD




President Wm. Howard Taft opening the water tunnel at Gunnison, Colorado c. 1909

Buller Collection ©






As our Museum Community grows through The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, we can expect more treasures like the photographs recently discovered in a North Hollywood steamer trunk. President Taft officially opened the Gunnison Tunnel in Colorado.

Sunday, June 3, 2007

THANKS FOR A GREAT MUSEUM BOARD MEETING









IVORY TAGS FROM THE U.S. INVASION OF IWO JIMA - WWII
collection of
San Fernando Valley Veteran, James L. Fecht
The Museum of the San Fernando Valley







Just a note of thanks to all of you who attended the meeting of the Board of Directors and Advisors this last Wednesday at Campo de Cahuenga. Our change of meeting time to 5:30 pm worked out well. Special thanks to Gary Fredburg for adding two great historic postcards to the Museum's collection. Tons of things have happened since the meeting, so check this blog a lot over the next week. Jerry Fecht

"The San Fernando Valley deserves a great regional Museum of history and culture."

Friday, June 1, 2007

"CRUISE NIGHT" AT BOB'S BIG BOY IN THE 1950s













"CRUISE NIGHT" - postcard in the collection of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley
Reproduced with the permission of the California artist Kent Bash

Popular Culture is a special interest of The Museum of the San Fernando Valley. Our growing collection of 1950s-60s memorabilia reflects our determination to capture not only the history of the San Fernando Valley, but its "spirit" and energy as well. Our Vice President, Gary Fredburg, always on the lookout for paper treasures for the Museum, has just presented us with several historic Valley postcards - one of which is a scene from the "American Roadside" painting entitled "Cruise Night" by the much admired California artist, Kent Bash. The postcard features typical 1950s car awaiting carhop service at Bob's Big Boy on Van Nuys Boulevard.
When Kent gave this blog permission to share his work electronically from his website (www.kentbash.com/ - 2k) with the Museum Community, he noted:
"If you look around in the open edition gallery on my website you will likely find that a great many of the works there reveal the influence of growing up here in the San Fernando Valley. If you click on the images you will find the story behind the work for many of them.
These paintings are only the ones that are published and are available in print form. Once I get my web person in gear, a limited edition gallery will be added showing my varied other themes & series, many of which feature either locations, or are in some way
Influenced by having grown up here.
Currently, I'm finishing up my second book, and like my first, it will feature a number of both paintings and photographs from around both the San Fernando Valley & the Southern California area. Although it's not a history book it will have one 44-page chapter entitled "Cruising Bob's and Van Nuys Boulevard When Cruising Was King. My only regret is I couldn't find any good photographs of the Van Nuys Bob's. My book is entitled "Memos From Koolsville", it's a hot rod, art, pop and kustom kulture diary.
KENT BASH